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I have read in many places and seen in many charts that branch prediction works better for Floating point programs than for Integer programs. Why is this? Any suggestions on where to read about it?

Thanks!

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My gut says that floating-point programs are usually numerical and have simpler control flow, whereas integer programs are more often semi-numerical or non-numerical and have more complicated control flow. In other words, different types lend themselves to different usage patterns that are more-or-less favored by branch prediction mechanisms. –  Patrick87 Dec 6 '12 at 23:56
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There should be many papers noted this fact. E.g. bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/classes/cs252/Projects/Reports/… page 13-14 "The floating point programs have lower percentage of conditional branches than integer programs but have higher percentage of taken conditional branches as shows in figure 14 and figure 15. This is because those floating point programs have many long looping structures." –  osgx Dec 7 '12 at 1:36
    
@osgx why dont you make it an answer? –  fersarr Dec 19 '12 at 6:30

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There should be many papers noted this fact. E.g. The Schemes and Performances of Dynamic Branch predictors page 13-14

The floating point programs have lower percentage of conditional branches than integer programs but have higher percentage of taken conditional branches as shows in figure 14 and figure 15. This is because those floating point programs have many long looping structures.

There is also some statistics in this paper about SpecInt vs SpecFp - two sets of computer benchmark programs - integer set and floating point set. Bit outdated, but still contains several actual codes.

Other papers, e.g. this one says, that OOP (which is more often considered as integer task) is the indirect branching:

Indirect branches are much more frequent in object-oriented languages. These languages promote a more polymorphic programming style in which late binding of subroutine invocations is the main instrument for clean, modular code design. Virtual function tables, the implementation of choice for most C++ and Java compilers, execute an indirect branch for every polymorphic call. The C++ programs studied here execute an indirect branch as frequently as once every 50 instructions; other studies [CGZ94] have shown similar results. Java programs (where all non-static calls are virtual) are likely to use indirect calls even more frequently.

I think, floating point programs are usually array-orientied: do several loops of common code on every array's element. Computational algebra often uses static patterns in accessing near elements (e.g. it needs only [x-1][y] and [x-1][y-1] to compute [x][y]).

Integer programs are about complex data structures with lot of pointers. Every pointer traversal has some conditional code (check for NULL; conditional jmp to next iteration); dependencies between data are complex or dynamic. Even when integer code works with huge int array, e.g. pictures, there may be conditional code for saturating on under- and overflow. Sorting of arrays is lot of branching too.

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