Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a JFrame with a JMenuBar that I'm developing and testing on a Mac system. On this JFrame, I have programmed one of the JMenus to be disabled. However, when I change focus from my Java application to some other program on my computer and then come back to this JFrame, strange things are happening. I have observed that all of the menus become disabled. I have also observed that all of the menus become enabled. Can anyone tell me what's going on here?

Here's a piece of code that will reproduce the error (at least it does on my machine):

public class MenuProblemExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.setProperty("apple.laf.useScreenMenuBar", "true");
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        JMenuBar menuBar = new JMenuBar();
        JMenu fileMenu = new JMenu("File");
        fileMenu.add(new JMenuItem("open"));
        menuBar.add(fileMenu);
        JMenu editMenu = new JMenu("Edit");
        editMenu.add(new JMenuItem("select all"));
        menuBar.add(fileMenu);
        menuBar.add(editMenu);
        frame.setJMenuBar(menuBar);
        fileMenu.setEnabled(false);
        frame.setVisible(true);        
    }
}

When I run this, the enabled property isn't stable under the action of switching focus to another window and then back again.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post an SSCCE or a screenshot? –  Branislav Lazic Dec 7 '12 at 0:21
    
Everything work fine for me. I'm not Mac OS user, but I bet that something is wrong in this line of code: System.setProperty("apple.laf.useScreenMenuBar", "true"); Why are you setting that property at all? –  Branislav Lazic Dec 7 '12 at 0:48
    
It causes the frame's menubar to display at the top of the screen the way native apps do in the Mac OSX operating system. –  Adam Cross Dec 7 '12 at 0:53
    
And UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName()); stands for? :) –  Branislav Lazic Dec 7 '12 at 0:55
    
I don't understand your question. That code is not in my example. –  Adam Cross Dec 7 '12 at 0:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Swing GUI objects should be constructed and manipulated only on the event dispatch thread.

By design, Mac applications using the screen menubar disable menus in the background. It is up to your application to enable menus appropriately when your application comes to the foreground, using e.g. a WindowListener.

Addendum: For testing, this revised example adds a toggle button that tracks the state of the File > Open menu item.

import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import javax.swing.AbstractAction;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JMenu;
import javax.swing.JMenuBar;
import javax.swing.JMenuItem;
import javax.swing.JToggleButton;

/**
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/a/13756527/230513
 */
public class MenuProblemExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.setProperty("apple.laf.useScreenMenuBar", "true");
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                JFrame frame = new JFrame();
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                JMenuBar menuBar = new JMenuBar();
                JMenu fileMenu = new JMenu("File");
                final JMenuItem openItem = new JMenuItem("open");
                openItem.setEnabled(false);
                fileMenu.add(openItem);
                menuBar.add(fileMenu);
                JMenu editMenu = new JMenu("Edit");
                editMenu.add(new JMenuItem("select all"));
                menuBar.add(fileMenu);
                menuBar.add(editMenu);
                frame.setJMenuBar(menuBar);
                frame.add(new JToggleButton(new AbstractAction("Toggle") {

                    @Override
                    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                        JToggleButton b = (JToggleButton) e.getSource();
                        openItem.setEnabled(b.isSelected());
                    }
                }));
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
org.jhotdraw.samples.draw.Main, cited here, is an example. –  trashgod Dec 7 '12 at 3:44
    
Well, I can certainly use a WindowListener, but I'm curious that you say this behavior is "by design". Of course that menu has to vanish when my application is not in focus, but I don't see how it is ever desirable that the properties of my menu items should change just from moving focus to another window and back. Especially considering I have seen this vary unpredictably from all menu items suddenly enabled to all menu items suddenly disabled, I think this is a bug. –  Adam Cross Dec 7 '12 at 8:45
    
I can't rule out a bug, but Apple's Human Interface Guidelines specifies managing individual item's enabled state. If you don't work on the EDT, you'll experience unpredictable behavior. Once you're on the EDT, as shown above, it's easier to stay on. –  trashgod Dec 7 '12 at 11:37
    
Thanks for pointing out that issue about working on the event dispatch thread. It was among the things I didn't know I didn't know. –  Adam Cross Dec 7 '12 at 19:03
    
@AdamCross: It's foundational, but easily overlooked. I think you're right about items v. menus. I've updated the example for reference. –  trashgod Dec 7 '12 at 23:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.