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So I am having some trouble getting a field of an int and then sign extending it. I have a method that gets the field of an int.

getField(int value, int hi, int lo);

Value is the int that I'm taking a field from, and hi and lo is the size of the field.

So I can call this getField method inside getFieldSignExtended(int value, int hi, int lo), but how do I go about sign extending it?

e.g. value = 7, hi = 1, lo = 0

getField(7, 1, 0); returns 3 because 7 in binary is 111 and hi and lo take the field of 0 to 1.

With 3 returned from getField I get that value is equal 0x0003.

What I have so far works with positives, but messes up greatly on negatives. And when I say "mess up" I mean it doesnt work at all. So if I try to use it on -1 it shows up as a large int instead of a negative.

Thanks for any help! :]

Edit: Sorry I confused myself and some of you with a contradicting statement :P. Fixed.

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3  
'Sign-extending with zeros' is a contradiction in terms. 'Sign-extending' means 'copy the sign bit (0 or 1) into the extension'; extending it with zeros only is what happens if the type is unsigned and extended. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 7 '12 at 1:32
    
Your problem is under-specified, so there is a risk that this gets flagged "close" as "not a real question". Also, what approach have you tried? –  Kaz Dec 7 '12 at 1:33
    
Sign-extending in your example might mean returning -1, because if we take the bits 11 from ...0000111, we must interpret 11 as a two-bit two's complement value, which stands for -1. In C, on a two's complement platform, a signed struct/union bitfield that is two bits wide which holds 11 evaluates to -1. –  Kaz Dec 7 '12 at 1:34
    
I think you mean zero-filling a string, as per comments above this isn't the same thing as sign-extending. To zero-fill a string, do something like printf("%05d", value); –  therefromhere Dec 7 '12 at 1:37
    
Sorry guys, just edited it :). –  user1884136 Dec 7 '12 at 1:37

2 Answers 2

There's an awful lot of reading between the lines going on here. However, if getField(7, 1, 0) returns 3 and you need getFieldSignExtended(15, 2, 0) to return -3 and getFieldSignExtended(3, 2, 0) to return +3, then this might be what you're after.

The concept is that you treat an n-bit field from bits hi:lo of the original value as a 2's complement number. If the first bit of the n bits is a 1, then you want the n-bit field treated as a negative number. If the first bit of the 3-bit field is a 0, then you want it treated as a positive number.

#include <assert.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stdio.h>

extern int getFieldSignExtended(int value, int hi, int lo);

enum { INT_BITS = CHAR_BIT * sizeof(int) };

int getFieldSignExtended(int value, int hi, int lo)
{
    assert(lo >= 0);
    assert(hi > lo);
    assert(hi < INT_BITS - 1);
    int bits = (value >> lo) & ((1 << (hi - lo + 1)) - 1);
    if (bits & (1 << (hi - lo)))
        return(bits | (~0 << (hi - lo)));
    else
        return(bits);
}

The 3 assertions are straight-forward; the only controversial one is that the code refuses to deal with bit 31. If you invoked it with hi = 31 and lo = 0, then the shift (hi - lo + 1) is too big and the behaviour is undefined. You also run into the implementation-defined behaviour of right shifting a negative number. It would be possible to fix these issues by taking an unsigned integer argument and not doing the & operation if hi - lo + 1 == INT_BITS. Fixing the issues is left as an exercise for the reader.

The assignment to bits shifts the value right, and masks it with the correct number of bits. The (1 << (hi - lo + 1)) - 1 shifts 1 left by one more than than the number of bits in the field, then subtracts one to generate a string of binary 1's for each bit position in the field. For example, for hi = 2, lo = 0, this shifts 1 left 3 places, yields binary 1000; subtracting 1 gives 0111, so the correct 3 bits are selected. So, bits contains the appropriate set of bits for the n-bit integer.

The if test checks whether the most significant bit of the n-bit integer is set. If the sign bit isn't set, we simply return the value bits. If the sign bit is set, then we have a tricky calculation to perform — one that was (very) wrong in the first draft of this answer. Suppose we have a field of 3 bits = 101. As a 3-bit 2's complement number, that represents -3. We need to extend that to the left with all 1's to generate the full-size -1. The value of ~0 is all bits 1; when that's shifted left by hi - lo bits, it leaves a series of zeros for the non-sign-bits of the value. It would also work if you shifted left by hi - lo + 1, but there's extra computation needed for the + 1 that isn't necessary.

I used this test harness to satisfy myself that the code was working correctly. The systematic test output is rigorous (on smallish numbers). It ensures that the calculated value matches the expected value. The 'exhaustive' test isn't really exhaustive; it only tests one value, and it is more for observing problems (such as that using hi = 31 and lo = 0 gives an erroneous answer of 0 on my machine) and patterns.

static const struct
{
    int  value;
    int  hi;
    int  lo;
    int  wanted;
} tests[] =
{
    {   0x0F,  1,  0,   -1 },
    {   0x0F,  2,  0,   -1 },
    {   0x0F,  2,  1,   -1 },
    {   0x0F,  3,  1,   -1 },
    {   0x0F,  4,  2,   +3 },
    {   0x0F,  5,  0,  +15 },
    {   0x0F,  5,  1,   +7 },
    {   0x0F,  5,  2,   +3 },
    {   0x0F,  5,  3,   +1 },
    {   0x0F,  5,  4,    0 },
    {   0x03,  2,  0,   +3 },
    {   0xF3,  2,  0,   +3 },
    {   0xF3,  3,  0,   +3 },
    {   0xF3,  4,  0,  -13 },
    {   0xF3,  5,  0,  -13 },
    {   0xF3,  6,  0,  -13 },
    {   0xF3,  7,  0,  -13 },
    {   0xF3,  7,  1,   -7 },
    {   0xF3,  7,  2,   -4 },
    {   0xF3,  7,  3,   -2 },
    {   0xF3,  7,  4,   -1 },
    {   0xF3,  8,  0, 0xF3 },
};
enum { NUM_TESTS = sizeof(tests) / sizeof(tests[0]) };
static const char s_pass[] = "== PASS ==";
static const char s_fail[] = "!! FAIL !!";

static void systematic_test(void)
{
    int fail = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_TESTS; i++)
    {
        char const *pf = s_fail;
        int actual = getFieldSignExtended(tests[i].value, tests[i].hi, tests[i].lo);
        if (actual == tests[i].wanted)
            pf = s_pass;
        else
            fail++;
        printf("%s GFSX(%+4d = 0x%.4X, %d, %d) = %+4d = 0x%.8X (wanted %+4d = 0x%.8X)\n",
               pf, tests[i].value, tests[i].value, tests[i].hi, tests[i].lo, actual, actual,
               tests[i].wanted, tests[i].wanted);
    }
    printf("%s\n", (fail == 0) ? s_pass : s_fail);
}

static void exhaustive_test(void)
{
    int value = 0x5FA03CE7;
    for (int i = 1; i < INT_BITS - 1; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
        {
            int actual = getFieldSignExtended(value, i, j);
            printf("%11sGFSX(%d = 0x%X, %2d, %2d) = %+10d = 0x%.8X\n", "",
                    value, value, i, j, actual, actual);
        }
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int result1 = getFieldSignExtended(15, 2, 0);
    int result2 = getFieldSignExtended( 3, 2, 0);
    printf("GFSX(15, 2, 0) = %+d = 0x%.8X\n", result1, result1);
    printf("GFSX( 3, 2, 0) = %+d = 0x%.8X\n", result2, result2);

    printf("\nSystematic test\n");
    systematic_test();

    printf("\nExhaustive test\n");
    exhaustive_test();

    return(0);
}

This is the output of the test code before the exhaustive test, plus a small selection of the output from the exhaustive test:

GFSX(15, 2, 0) = -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF
GFSX( 3, 2, 0) = +3 = 0x00000003

Systematic test
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 1, 0) =   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF (wanted   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 2, 0) =   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF (wanted   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 2, 1) =   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF (wanted   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 3, 1) =   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF (wanted   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 4, 2) =   +3 = 0x00000003 (wanted   +3 = 0x00000003)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 5, 0) =  +15 = 0x0000000F (wanted  +15 = 0x0000000F)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 5, 1) =   +7 = 0x00000007 (wanted   +7 = 0x00000007)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 5, 2) =   +3 = 0x00000003 (wanted   +3 = 0x00000003)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 5, 3) =   +1 = 0x00000001 (wanted   +1 = 0x00000001)
== PASS == GFSX( +15 = 0x000F, 5, 4) =   +0 = 0x00000000 (wanted   +0 = 0x00000000)
== PASS == GFSX(  +3 = 0x0003, 2, 0) =   +3 = 0x00000003 (wanted   +3 = 0x00000003)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 2, 0) =   +3 = 0x00000003 (wanted   +3 = 0x00000003)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 3, 0) =   +3 = 0x00000003 (wanted   +3 = 0x00000003)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 4, 0) =  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3 (wanted  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 5, 0) =  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3 (wanted  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 6, 0) =  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3 (wanted  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 7, 0) =  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3 (wanted  -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 7, 1) =   -7 = 0xFFFFFFF9 (wanted   -7 = 0xFFFFFFF9)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 7, 2) =   -4 = 0xFFFFFFFC (wanted   -4 = 0xFFFFFFFC)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 7, 3) =   -2 = 0xFFFFFFFE (wanted   -2 = 0xFFFFFFFE)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 7, 4) =   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF (wanted   -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF)
== PASS == GFSX(+243 = 0x00F3, 8, 0) = +243 = 0x000000F3 (wanted +243 = 0x000000F3)
== PASS ==

Exhaustive test
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  1,  0) =         -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  2,  0) =         -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  2,  1) =         -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  3,  0) =         +7 = 0x00000007
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  3,  1) =         +3 = 0x00000003
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  3,  2) =         +1 = 0x00000001
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  4,  0) =         +7 = 0x00000007
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  4,  1) =         +3 = 0x00000003
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  4,  2) =         +1 = 0x00000001
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  4,  3) =         +0 = 0x00000000
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  5,  0) =        -25 = 0xFFFFFFE7
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  5,  1) =        -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  5,  2) =         -7 = 0xFFFFFFF9
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  5,  3) =         -4 = 0xFFFFFFFC
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  5,  4) =         -2 = 0xFFFFFFFE
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  0) =        -25 = 0xFFFFFFE7
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  1) =        -13 = 0xFFFFFFF3
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  2) =         -7 = 0xFFFFFFF9
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  3) =         -4 = 0xFFFFFFFC
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  4) =         -2 = 0xFFFFFFFE
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7,  6,  5) =         -1 = 0xFFFFFFFF
...
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 29, 28) =         +1 = 0x00000001
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  0) = -543146777 = 0xDFA03CE7
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  1) = -271573389 = 0xEFD01E73
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  2) = -135786695 = 0xF7E80F39
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  3) =  -67893348 = 0xFBF4079C
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  4) =  -33946674 = 0xFDFA03CE
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  5) =  -16973337 = 0xFEFD01E7
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  6) =   -8486669 = 0xFF7E80F3
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  7) =   -4243335 = 0xFFBF4079
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  8) =   -2121668 = 0xFFDFA03C
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30,  9) =   -1060834 = 0xFFEFD01E
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 10) =    -530417 = 0xFFF7E80F
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 11) =    -265209 = 0xFFFBF407
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 12) =    -132605 = 0xFFFDFA03
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 13) =     -66303 = 0xFFFEFD01
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 14) =     -33152 = 0xFFFF7E80
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 15) =     -16576 = 0xFFFFBF40
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 16) =      -8288 = 0xFFFFDFA0
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 17) =      -4144 = 0xFFFFEFD0
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 18) =      -2072 = 0xFFFFF7E8
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 19) =      -1036 = 0xFFFFFBF4
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 20) =       -518 = 0xFFFFFDFA
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 21) =       -259 = 0xFFFFFEFD
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 22) =       -130 = 0xFFFFFF7E
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 23) =        -65 = 0xFFFFFFBF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 24) =        -33 = 0xFFFFFFDF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 25) =        -17 = 0xFFFFFFEF
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 26) =         -9 = 0xFFFFFFF7
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 27) =         -5 = 0xFFFFFFFB
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 28) =         -3 = 0xFFFFFFFD
       GFSX(1604336871 = 0x5FA03CE7, 30, 29) =         -2 = 0xFFFFFFFE
share|improve this answer

There are multiple approaches that you can take. If you were just starting out, you could just arithmetically calculate the number of bits in the field. So, for instance:

if (value %2 >= 1)
{
    // you know that the value has a `1` as the lest significant digit. 
    // if that's one of the digits you're looking for, you can do something like count++ here
}
else
{
    // least significant digit is a '0'
}

and then

if (value % 4 >=2)
{
    // you know that the second least significant digit is `1`
    // etc.
}

If you do it that way, you'll probably want to work those into a loop of some sort.

Now, a better way to do it is using bitwise anding, like this:

if (value & 8 != 0)
    // here you know that the fourth least significant digit (the one representing 8) is 1.
    // do a Google search on bitwise anding to get more information.
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your answer doesn't provide a complete solution to the problem posed, which means it is of limited value. It isn't entirely clear to me how you plan to extend what you say into solving the problem. Generally, a good answer on SO will either be complete or be readily completable. If you had a good alternative interpretation of the question (which does need interpreting; it is not a stellar question), then it would be great to see your alternative answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '13 at 16:43

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