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Javascript is pretty shaky for me, and I can't seem to find the answer to this. I have some code along the lines of

var Scheduler = function(divid,startDate,mode){

    this.setHeader = function(){
          header.innerHTML = '<a href="#" onclick="this.showScheduler(1);">Show</a>';

    }

   this.showScheduler = function period(){

        ...
   }

};

My problem is, how do I put the onclick into the HTML so that it properly calls the showScheduler function for the appropriate instance of the current scheduler object that I'm working with?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use a framework for this type of thing. If you don't use one then you gotta declare each instance of schedular as a global object, and you will need the name of the instance in order to call it from the link. Look at the following link

http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/examples/event/eventsimple.html

They only show a function being applied, but you can also do something like this

YAHOO.util.Event.addListener(myAnchorDom, "click", this.showScheduler,this,true);

Where myAnchorDom is the achor tag dom object. This will have showScheduler function execute within the scope of your scheduler object.

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2  
You don't need a framework to set myAnchorElement.onclick = .... –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:06
1  
No, but setting onclick directly is a bad idea and always has been. Which is why everyone who knows what they're doing uses the add/attach pair. –  annakata Sep 3 '09 at 20:15
    
You don't need one... but why make life difficult on yourself handling cross browser issues. –  Zoidberg Sep 3 '09 at 20:16
    
This may actually be the most useful for me because I am using YUI elsewhere in the script. I'm going to play with this first and see if I can't get it working. Thank you. –  Amy Anuszewski Sep 3 '09 at 20:21
3  
@Amy: You should tag your questions with any frameworks you are using. That way answers don't have to be as widely varying as the ones you've gotten so far. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:23

I wouldn't do whatever it is you're doing the way you're doing it, but with the code the way you have it, I would do this (lots ofdo and doing :) ):

var Scheduler = function(divid, startDate, mode){
    var that = this;

    this.setHeader = function(){
          header.innerHTML = '<a href="#">Show</a>';
          header.firstChild.onclick = function() { that.showScheduler(1); };
    }

   this.showScheduler = function period(){

        ...
   }
};
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1  
I'm surprised by the lack of clarity around ol' school event handlers and DOM elements in the answers so far. Yours is the first to get it. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:02
1  
@Zoidberg: it works in Firefox just fine. Actually it works in every browser made since 1998. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:08
1  
@Zoidberg - If you set the onclick attribute yes, but not the onclick property. They are two different things. header.firstChild.onclick = function() { that.showScheduler(1); }; is not the same thing as header.firstChild.setAttribute("onclick", "function() { that.showScheduler(1); };"); –  nickytonline Sep 3 '09 at 20:16
1  
@Zoidberg: You're thinking of setAttribute and event handlers (which you are right, would fail in all IEs). See webbugtrack.blogspot.com/2007/08/…. However the onclick attribute takes a function object as it's value and works in all browsers. See –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:17
1  
@Zoidberg: that is not a global variable. nickyt simply used a closure to capture the instance of Scheduler. It's a well known JavaScript idiom. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:21

Instead of working with innerHTML use the DOM methods.

Try replacing this:

header.innerHTML = '<a href="#" onclick="this.showScheduler(1);">Show</a>';

with this:

var x = this; // create a closure reference
var anchor = document.createElement('a');
anchor.href= '#';
anchor.innerHTML = 'Show';
anchor.onclick = function() { x.showScheduler(1); }; //don't use onclick in real life, use some real event binding from a library
header.appendChild(anchor);

Explanation:

The "this" in the original code refers to the element which fired the event, i.e. the anchor ("this' is notoriously problematic for things like, well, like this). The solution is to create a closure on the correct method (which is why you have to create something like the var x above) which then only leaves the problem of passing in the parameter which is accomplished by wrapping the method in another function.

Strictly speaking it would be much preferable to bind eventhandlers with the addEventListener/attachEvent pair (because direct event assignment precludes the ability to assign multiple handlers to one event) but it's best handled using a library like jquery if you're new to JS anyway.

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Why "use some real event binding from a library"? –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:10
    
Because for a newbie events are one of the hardest things to wrap your head around. I would strongly advise using something which just works rather than spending time getting it right and/or reinventing wheels. –  annakata Sep 3 '09 at 20:17
    
@annakata: very good point. It also avoids this: stackoverflow.com/questions/95731/… –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:25
    
Well quite, but setAttribute is toxic anyway :) –  annakata Sep 3 '09 at 20:41

You can add an event handler to the header object directly:

var me = this;

this.setHeader = function(){
          header.innerHTML = '<a href="#" onclick="this.showScheduler(1);">Show</a>';

header.addHandler("click", function(e) { me.showScheduler(1); });
    }

Insite the passed function, this will refer to the header element.

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1  
Is the addListener function from a framework? –  Zoidberg Sep 3 '09 at 20:00
    
Its a mistake on my part. I am not sure on the exact name, but its a function available without framework, however the call is different for IE and FF. –  eulerfx Sep 3 '09 at 20:01
var Scheduler = function(divid, startDate, mode)
{
    var xthis = this;

    this.setHeader = function()
    {
          var lnk = document.createElement("a");
          lnk.addEventListener("click", xthis.showScheduler, false);
          lnk.innerText = "Show";
          lnk.setAttribute('href', "#");
          header.appendChild(lnk);
    }

   this.showScheduler = function period(){

        ...
   }
};
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1  
lnk.addEventListener won't work in IE, and lnk.innerText= will only work in IE. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 3 '09 at 20:12
    
ok, is right. would be better as it does @annakata –  andres descalzo Sep 3 '09 at 21:38

When using "this" inside the onclick attribute, you're actually referring to the anchor tag object. Try this and see if it works:

this.setHeader = function(){
      header.innerHTML = '<a href="#" onclick="Scheduler.showScheduler(1);">Show</a>';
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work unless you use Scheduler as a static object. –  Zoidberg Sep 3 '09 at 20:00
    
True. Perhaps a poor assumption on my part. –  Joe D Sep 3 '09 at 20:05

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