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I'm working on a small site (project for a grad school class), and I've got a bunch of html forms that collect data and pass it to a MySQL database. Currently each form (most exist on separate pages) calls a different php file as the form action. As the site grows, this is becoming a bit of a mess. Is it common, or an acceptable/recommended approach, to have a single php file that all forms call as their action on submit, and then to use a switch statement in that php file to determine which block of code to execute?

If so, would I want to use a hidden input type in my form to indicate which switch case to run, e.g. in my form:

<input type="hidden" name="my_case" value="add_user">

...

in my php file:

switch($_POST['my_case']) {

case 'add_user':
   // do soemthing
   break;
case 'del_user':
   // do something
   break;
}

Thanks!

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closed as not constructive by Ja͢ck, Waleed Khan, Ravi Gadag, evilone, VMAtm Dec 7 '12 at 7:30

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Just saw this in the sidebar... it's similar to my question, but I'd still like some clarification as to if this is the proper way to handle things...Multiple forms and one PHP receiver –  PSUlion01 Dec 7 '12 at 3:02

5 Answers 5

I'm going to wade into this discussion with my two cents gripped firmly in hand.

Using a single form handler is dependent on how similar the forms are/data collected is

If you have a number of forms which are, more or less the same (same fields, same logic, just minor differences, like who gets emailed the content of each instance of the form), then having a single handler which can process all those forms is the best way to go.

If you have a number of forms, which have nothing (or very little) in common other than the fact that they are forms, then having a single handler may not be the best option. That being said, again, you could group the forms into "families" based on similarity and then build handlers for each of those families. (ie a "Send Email" family, a "File Upload" family, etc.)

Less files is, certainly, a plus when it comes to maintenance, as there are less places you need to look for something, but you should not sacrifice the logical separation of responsibilities/functionality in an effort to jam everything into a single file.

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I don't think there is any standard way that this is done.. Its all about preference.. Thats the beautiful thing about writing code is that YOU get to create the solution and if it works for what you are doing then it's fine. If you determine later that it needs to be reworked then you can.

If the size of you code is becoming cumbersome to deal with you could always break it up into separate files and then call include("file_name.php") in your case statements to just execute the script you need..

switch($_POST['my_case']) {
  case 'add_user':
    include("add_user.php");
    break;
  case 'del_user':
    include("del_user.php");
  break;
}

If things are going to get really complex then you might consider classes. In this case you could have a user class that has an add method and a delete method, then you would include the user class and then use it like this..

$user = new User();

$user->add();
$user->delete();

Like I said though it all depends on your specific needs. Find what works for you and roll with it.

To answer about the hidden input, if you must use the POST method then this would be necessary. You could also use GET and append some sort of indicator to the query portion of the form url. like ?action=add

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How did you construct the user if it was yet to be added? –  Waleed Khan Dec 7 '12 at 3:21
    
if you read, I said you would include the user class.. Meaning that I didn't show that code.. –  Kelly Copley Dec 7 '12 at 3:28
1  
I mean to say that it doesn't make sense to construct a user, if to construct a user you need to execute an add method. In this case, I would not have the add code be in a method of the user, but instead part of a factory. –  Waleed Khan Dec 7 '12 at 3:29
    
Possibly, but that is not always the case.. You may construct the object, call other methods to modify its data and then call the add method which could then take care of inserting the information into a database.. There is no indication what the add method is doing here.. Goes back to my original point that its up to you to design your code the way you want. –  Kelly Copley Dec 7 '12 at 3:34

These days, you would implement what's called a RESTful API. In addition to POST, HTTP supports DELETE, GET, and PUT methods. Use the type of submission to determine what action your code should execute.

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Doing it this way creates a single point of entry that other programmers can use to follow the program logic. If there are fifty PHP files, each targeted by a different form or AJAX request, no matter how well named they are, another programmer looking at the code base will have no idea what they are for. A single entry point like this allows for easier readability and maintainability, both for you and other programmers.

Edit: Let me make clear that I don't recommend putting all the code in that one file. You can have fifty PHP files. But in this file with the case statement, you can have:

switch($_POST['my_case']) {

    case 'add_user':
    include_once 'add_user_handler.php';
    // call function in add_user_handler.php to initiate execution
    break;

   case 'del_user':
   include_once 'del_user_handler.php';
   // call function in del_user_handler.php to initiate execution
   break;

   // And of course, good programming practice, use default
   default:
   exit("Unable to handle request");
   break;
}
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I'm going to disagree that it should be done for this reason because you would then have heaps of unrelated code in one file. In addition, I don't think that verb-oriented design, as you specify, will work very well should the application be using an object-oriented system (and we all know how OOP PHP frameworks are all the rage nowadays). I think decent naming conventions and directory structure can mitigate the inability of a developer to find what they're looking for. –  Waleed Khan Dec 7 '12 at 3:17
    
@WaleedKhan I don't suggest putting all the code into one file, just the case statement that starts the execution of the PHP script, which is based on the incoming data from the client. One can use an "include_once" in each block to include the correct file and then call the desired function in that file. –  kermit Dec 7 '12 at 3:19

OK, I never read about this, but In my case usually I don't use form, I mean, I don't use the classic button "submit", instead of that with ajax I send everything and through events, when the user clicks in a picture (like a button), or similar. The point is that thanks to this I can send diferent part (like if they were different forms) from a section, by using only a controller (and this is your issue). I never had a problem, really in this way you can handle everything very good because you tie CONTROLLER--VIEW--FORMS_OF_THIS_VIEW. It's a nice way of managing all that information, because usually you have a view and controller matching with a question (car, preferences, offers, login, etc). In this way you can find everything very easy (the controller, the view, al the forms, the precess)

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3  
So you break semantics, and then require your user to use javascript to submit the data? –  Kelly Copley Dec 7 '12 at 3:23
1  
When using ajax you should always use a standard form element and then use javascript to enhance the functionality. That way if the user has javascript disabled your site will degrade gracefully and still be useable. –  Kelly Copley Dec 7 '12 at 3:26
    
my answer was about another stuff, not about using buttons or pictures...........but you gave me a negative point for this (without relation with controller and multiple forms)...........ok, but I disagree. This question is not about javascript or semantic, but how to process forms, if that is your personal opinion for me It's perfect, but this question is about something different, and I answered it. –  francis Dec 8 '12 at 3:46

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