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Quick Edit: This is a homework assignment. My goal is to take in a few cl arguments for my program (either -s, -w with a width length, and the file) and word wrap the file that according the default length of 40 characters or a new number if the user chooses the '-w' option.

I'm trying to write a C program that takes in the arguments via command prompt (the executable is named "wrapfile.exe"). The program isn't done and more is to be added, this is just a part of it that is causing me mayhem.

Here would be an example of valid command prompt entries:

C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile -s filename.txt
C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile -w 5 filename.txt
C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile -s -w 50 filename.txt

etc.

Example of invalid entries:

C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile 
C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile -w
C:\"within wrapfile.exe's directory"> wrapfile qwer

etc.

My issue is it cannot detect the number after I enter "-w" ..

Here is the code:

#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"
#include "io.h"
#include "string.h"


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int output = 0;
int commands = 1;
int wraplength= 41;
int i=0;
int counter=0;
int wordwrap = 0;
int ExitStatus = 1;
int input = 1;
int w = 0;
int s = 0;
FILE *f = NULL;


for (i=0; i < argc; i++)
{
    if ( (*argv[input] + i-1) == '-') // check for option
    {
        printf(" - detected first");
        if (*(argv[input] + i  ) == 's') // check for wordwrap
        {
            printf(" s detected");
            i++;
            i++;
            s = 1; // set s to true to that option can be added later
            wordwrap = 1; // set wordwrap on or true
        }   

        if (*(argv[input] + i) ==  'w')//if the second option is a w
        {
            i++;
            printf(" w detected ");
            sscanf ((argv[input] + i), "%d", &wraplength);
            printf ("%d", wraplength);
            if ( wraplength < 1) // check what the number is
                {
                    printf("Usage: wrapfile [-s] [-w width] file ...");
                    return 2; // command line options incorrect
                }               
        }

        if (*(argv[input] + i) == '-')
        {
            printf(" second - detected");
            i++;

            if (*(argv[input]+ i) ==  'w')//if the second option is a w
            {
                i++;

                if (sscanf ((argv[(input)+1]), "%d", &wraplength) != 1) // check what the number is
                {
                    printf("Usage: wrapfile [-s] [-w width] file ...");
                    return 2; // command line options incorrect
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
return 0;
}

BIG EDIT: I took Dietrich Epp suggestion and here is something I did with it. It seems my program crashes every time I try to check an argument after "-s". How can I check the next arguments (if there is none?) without crashing my program. I know that this line has something to do with the crashing:

   arg = argv[i++];

Here's the code:

while (i < argc) 
{
    arg = argv[i++];
    if (!strcmp(arg, "-s")) 
    {
        arg = argv[i++];
        son = 1; 
        printf("Have -s\n");
        if (!strcmp(arg, "-w"))
        {
            if (i >= argc)
            {
                printf("Usage: wrapfile [-s] [-w width] file ...");
            }
            param = argv[i++];
            wraplength = *param;
            printf("Have -w %s\n", param);
        }

    }
share|improve this question
    
If you're going to have a significant number of cli options or particulary complex ones, I strongly recommend against parsing it manually and use a lib. I'm not entirely sure what the norm in C is on the Windows platform though. –  Troy Dec 7 '12 at 3:19
    
Ahead of time, excuse the messy code, just a bit stressful. @Troy I'm not totally sure what you mean by using a library? (assuming 'lib' is an abbreviation for library). –  Robolisk Dec 7 '12 at 3:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you're mixing up your loop variables here.

This makes i loop over all arguments, including argv[0] which you usually don't want.

for (i=0; i < argc; i++)

This uses i as an index into one of the argument strings, but with funny syntax.

if (*(argv[input] + i  ) == 's')

On other systems you'd just use getopt(), but that's not always an option on Windows.

Suggestion

You'll want a loop more like this:

// Note: C99, so you will need to translate to C89 if you use Microsoft's
// C compiler
int i = 1;
while (i < argc) {
    char *arg = argv[i++];
    if (!strcmp(arg, "-s")) {
        printf("Have -s\n");
    } else if (!strcmp(arg, "-w")) {
        if (i >= argc)
            error();
        char *param = argv[i++];
        printf("Have -w %s\n", param);
    } else {
        error();
    }
}

Command option parsing is so incredibly not relevant to your program's performance that the above chain of if/else blocks and strcmp() are fine.

Warning!

You will not be able to specify arbitrary filenames with this! If you get the arguments from main(), they will be converted to whichever code page you are currently using, which is horribly broken for almost any purpose. (It might be fine if you are the only one using the program.)

In order to specify arbitrary filenames, you will need to call GetCommandLineW() to get the command line in UTF-16, and then CommandLineToArgvW() to parse it to int argc and wchar_t **argv.

share|improve this answer
    
oh boy. This is a whole new way of looking at it. I edited my question a bit because after reading over I feel I wasn't clear enough. Regarding your warning, I do need filenames to work. The arguments need to be ATLEAST a filename being passed through into the program, as it will wrap the text on the file (with the selected settings). Putting "!" in front of strcmp, what does that do? –  Robolisk Dec 7 '12 at 3:32
    
@Robolisk: strcmp() returns 0 if the strings are identical, so !strcmp(x, y) is 1 if the strings are identical. This will handle filenames like input.txt, it just won't handle arbitrary filenames like crème_brûlée.txt or 日本語わかんない.txt unless you get lucky with locale. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 7 '12 at 3:40
    
ohhhh! Okay! Thanks a lot, I'll give this method a try! –  Robolisk Dec 7 '12 at 3:41
    
I've been using your suggestion, and it was working great then I hit a wall, I put a edit in my question directing to your suggestion. –  Robolisk Dec 7 '12 at 4:10
    
@Robolisk: It looks like you've made some substantial changes. Pay attention to the use of if/else in the sample I've provided, and think about whether if (!strcmp(arg, "-w")) should be inside or outside if (!strcmp(arg, "-s")), and what the difference is between the two. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 7 '12 at 4:41

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