Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've just created Photoshop mockup and all the shadow & highlight layers are set to "overlay" instead of "normal".

After I save them as .png and display on my site they look horrible, as Photoshop uses filters and png/css don't.

Is there any way of fixing it?

I can't save the highlight as .jpg / .png file with background, it needs to be saved as semi-transparent .png and placed over background image using multiple backgrounds technique.

Any hints / ideas? Tried playing with opacity / highlight color, but still far from perfection. Maybe there's some CSS way?

PS Overlay vs .png

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a solution, but in javascript. No way how to do that in css.

http://www.pixastic.com/lib/docs/actions/blend/

share|improve this answer

Short answer: no.

Long answer: You have two options and neither of them involves doing it in CSS:

  1. Use one of the JavaScript plugins out there that will replicate these functions with some complex calculations (an example of one can be found in the comment Vladimir Volek left on the original question: Is there a way to mimic photoshop's overlay filter with CSS?).
  2. It's generally possible to recreate these effects using different (and more time-consuming, case-by-case methods) in Photoshop. I'll usually ask the designer if he/she can go back and re-do them if they have time, and if not, I'll spend wayyy too much time doing it myself. I hate to use JS for a silly presentational thing like this.
share|improve this answer

I have had the exact same problem... the way I have found to do this is to try to recreate the image using opacity instead of overlay. With the image you attached above... you can probably use the gradient tool with colors Black to transparent. Apply them to a new layer and then change the opacity down until you like it. Then you can remove the background and save it as a png.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.