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I want to get an estimate for the worst-case scenario of an algorithm where the number of iterations depends on how many pixels in an image have neighbours that differ from themselves. Assuming the image to be in grayscale, I'm looking for a way to generate an M x N matrix filled with random values in the range [0, 255] where no two pixels with the same value are contiguous (including "corner" neighbours, i.e. this is for the 8-neighbour case).

Edit: should've made this clearer in the original posting. I'm looking to get a relatively uniform sampling of all values in the range [0, 255].

How would one do this? The efficiency of the solution doesn't really matter, I'm looking for something that's easy to reason about.

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It works to cut the matrix into 8x8 blocks and fill each block consecutively from 0 to 255 –  jwpat7 Dec 7 '12 at 3:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
0 1 0 1 0 1 0
2 3 2 3 2 3 2
1 0 1 0 1 0 1

etc.

More generally, the dumbest way to try to colour a graph is to visit each vertex in turn (in any order you like), and give it a colour that hasn't already been used for a vertex that's adjacent to it. If (as in this case) you have more colours than the greatest possible number of adjacent vertices, you can't lose.

The grid above is the result of visiting the matrix from left-to-right along each row, and using the smallest available value. You can instead choose one at random from the available values:

import random
rows = [[None] * 10 for i in xrange(10)] # or numpy matrix
for i, row in enumerate(rows):
    for j, _ in enumerate(row):
        available = set(xrange(256))
        if j > 0:
            available.discard(row[j-1])
        if i > 0:
            available.difference_update(rows[i-1][max(0,j-1):j+2])
        row[j] = random.choice(tuple(available))
print '\n'.join(map(str, rows))
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This doesn't really solve my problem, since I'm looking to get a random sampling within 0..255. But since this wasn't quite clear from the original question, and since this answer is clever, +1! –  louism Dec 7 '12 at 3:44
    
@louism: updated in response. –  Steve Jessop Dec 7 '12 at 3:45

Try this:

import numpy as np
np.cumsum(np.cumsum(np.ones((M,N)),axis=0),axis=1) % 255
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Starts [ [1, 2], [2, 4] ], which has diagonally-adjacent 2s. –  Steve Jessop Dec 7 '12 at 3:54
    
Yup, does not work. –  louism Dec 7 '12 at 3:55
import numpy as np
from random import sample
def foo(M,N):
    #Create an np array of size M X N
    img = np.zeros((M,N))
    #Create a colour set within grayscale
    colours = set(range(255))
    #Iterate through the entire image pixel
    for i in range(M):
        for j in range(N):
            #img[i-1:i+2,j - 1:j + 2].flatten() : neighbouring pixel
            #including the current pixel
            #colours- set(img[i-1:i+2,j - 1:j + 2].flatten() : Colours not in the neighbouring pixel
            #sample(colours- set(img[i-1:i+2,j - 1:j + 2].flatten()),1)[0]: Select one from the above
            #and assign to the current pixel
            img[i,j] = sample(colours- set(img[i-1:i+2,j - 1:j + 2].flatten()),1)[0]
    return img


>>> foo(10,10)
array([[ 153.,  128.,   15.,  163.,  180.,  189.,  186.,  228.,   65.,
         140.],
       [  52.,  229.,  220.,   54.,   79.,  105.,   11.,  146.,   29.,
          70.],
       [ 244.,  119.,  188.,  147.,  230.,  157.,   28.,  243.,  105.,
          62.],
       [ 188.,  135.,  129.,  144.,  192.,   11.,   90.,  193.,   35.,
         149.],
       [  20.,  130.,  140.,  134.,  191.,   63.,   50.,  180.,   49.,
           4.],
       [  88.,  175.,  254.,  151.,  176.,   30.,  122.,  157.,   88.,
          82.],
       [  37.,  190.,   10.,  187.,  221.,   83.,    2.,  115.,  191.,
         148.],
       [  53.,   70.,  150.,  127.,  168.,  141.,  179.,   65.,  253.,
          59.],
       [  96.,    3.,  225.,  218.,   87.,   76.,   41.,  195.,  221.,
         192.],
       [  28.,   35.,  104.,  130.,  207.,   57.,  204.,  228.,   96.,
         174.]])
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Since you mentioned that efficiency doesn't matter, try this:

  from numpy import array
  import random

  available = range(256)
  M=10
  N=5
  def generate():
    return random.choice(available)

  def get_neighbours(i,j):
    neighbours = []
    try:
      neighbours.append(matrix[i][j-1])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i][j+1])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i+1][j])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i-1][j])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i-1][j-1])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i-1][j+1])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i+1][j-1])
      neighbours.append(matrix[i+1][j+1])
    except:
      pass
    return neighbours

  def remove_neighbours(neighbours):
  available = range(256)
    for i in neighbours:
       try: available.remove(i)
       except: pass
    return available

  #First initialize a random matrix without any condition
  matrix = array([[generate() for i in range(M)] for j in range(N)])

  #Apply the condition and modify the matrix
  for i in range(N):
    for j in range(M):
      neighbours = get_neighbours(i,j)
      available = remove_neighbours(neighbours)
      matrix[i][j] = generate() 

  print matrix


 [[215  91   6 110 166 214 189  63  89 107]
  [  5 136  85 200 216  87 105 223 132 112]
  [179 159 116  70   3  44 238  13  41 226]
  [ 48   0  37 248 209 162 211  61  50  40]
  [237 122 135 253 219 196  92 173 163  26]]
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