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Suppose I have a struct defined this way:

struct myStruct{
    data* anotherStruct;
}

Suppose I allocate memory on the heap for a struct of type myStruct. The pointer to this struct is called ptr. I then call free(ptr). Does this free the memory allocated just for myStruct, or does it free the memory allocated for myStruct and anotherStruct?

If it frees only the memory allocated for myStruct, does this lead to a memory leak because there is no pointer to anotherStruct and that can never be freed?

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7 Answers 7

It frees only the memory allocated to that address. i.e: Yes the highest level.

Does this free the memory allocated just for myStruct, or does it free the memory allocated for myStruct and anotherStruct?

It only frees memory allocated to myStruct.

If it frees only the memory allocated for myStruct, does this lead to a memory leak because there is no pointer to anotherStruct and that can never be freed?

If you don't have a pointer to anotherStruct then yes it leakes the memory. The usual strategy is to deallocate memory in reverse order of the order you allocated it.

For ex: In your case you first allocated myStruct and then anotherStruct, So you should deallocate in exactly inverse order, i.e: free anotherStruct first and then myStruct.

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Only the highest level. It's not quite that smart.

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Welcome to SO! Thanks for your answer. More context would help. –  dinkelk Dec 7 '12 at 4:36

In the code

struct myStruct *ptr = malloc(sizeof(myStruct));
.
.
.
free(ptr);

nothing shown has affected the anotherStruct member of *ptr, ptr->anotherStruct. You'd probably want to use malloc to point ptr->anotherStruct to a useful block of memory. You'd then have to call free(ptr->anotherStruct) before calling free(ptr) to avoid any memory leaks.

It can be quite useful to define initialization and destruction functions in order to handle such "internal (de)allocation" automatically.

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"free" can only free the memory allocated at the highest level. The simple reason being, for the pointer members inside a struct, you may or may not allocate memory from the heap. How will free be able to keep track from where all pointer member's memory came from?

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it only frees the the memory allocated to that address, if you would like to free the whole chained list then you will have to loop through it and free one element each time (a struct in your case), you will have to save the address to the next struct free the actual pointer then move to the next one and keep doing till you reach the pointer that points to null.

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Address is the key for freeing memory. each malloc() returned memory is a separate key. so upper block(i.e memory allocated for myStruct type) only freed and leads to memory leak.

Best practice is to free those internal blocks, then free the upper one. otherwise you will loose the pointer address if not stored anywhere.

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Yes, as everyone said , it will free the memory allocated only for the struct, NOT what the anotherStruct points to. it will certainly make memory leak. it is programmers responsibility to free the memory allocated dynamically.

you can use a tool "valgrind" to check the memory leak.

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