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Using Python 3.2 on Win7 x64. I have a script that I would like to run every time I start IDLE. This is my script:

import sys
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

sys.setrecursionlimit(2000)

soup = BeautifulSoup()
def soupSetup(file_name, encode_type):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(open("C:\\Python32\\html\\"+file_name+".html", encoding=encode_type))

This way everything is set and all I have to do is pass soupSetup() the html file I want to use and I can start working with the data.

My issue is this- if I use the code as is when I use print(soup.prettify())I get nothing returned but a blank line. If I don't instantiate the class first when I run the print statement I get:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#22>", line 1, in <module>
    print(soup.prettify())
NameError: name 'soup' is not defined

For those not familiar with BeautifulSoup soup is an instance of <class 'bs4.BeautifulSoup'>.

How can I make the soup object persist outside of my script?

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1  
Two questions in one it looks like. The first question regarding code to be executed on startup is solved by creating the modules usercustomize/sitecustomize in some directory according to docs.python.org/dev/library/site.html. Now the second question can be solved by augmenting __builtin__: import __builtin__; setattr(__builtin__, 'soup', soup) on the startup module and then soup will be magically available everywhere else. I don't recommend doing this, you might need to rethink what you want to achieve. Also, in your correct approach you will need to redefine the global soup. –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 4:57
    
you should put this as the answer ... since it fully answers his question ... –  Joran Beasley Dec 7 '12 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You create a name soup that is global for the module, with your statement soup = BeautifulSoup(). And then, in the function soupSetup you want to reassign the soup name to another BeautifulSoup() object, this time with data.

However: Names inside a function is local to that function and does not persist outside that function. So you end up not reassigning the global soup name, but creating a new separate soup variable inside the function, which is then deleted when the function exists. The global soup is not being changed. This is why you get the empty BeatifulSoup() object you created first when you use the soup variable.

What you need to do is tell the function that you want to reassign the global name, like this:

def soupSetup(file_name, encode_type):
    global soup
    soup = BeautifulSoup(open("C:\\Python32\\html\\"+file_name+".html", encoding=encode_type))

That should do it. Also, you don't have to set soup = BeautifulSoup(), it doesn't matter what you set it to as it will be overwritten by the function. Just do this instead:

soup = None

The full code should then end up as:

import sys
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

sys.setrecursionlimit(2000)

soup = None
def soupSetup(file_name, encode_type):
    global soup
    soup = BeautifulSoup(open("C:\\Python32\\html\\"+file_name+".html", encoding=encode_type))
share|improve this answer
    
That really misses the point. He gets a NameError exception. –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 12:32
    
@mmgp: He only gets the NameError exception if he doesn't, as he say, "instantiate the class first", ie if skips the module-level soup = BeautifulSoup() statement. Even after re-reading I am pretty confident I have not missed any points. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 7 '12 at 22:01
    
I honestly think you misunderstood what he tried. He has some code that supposedly runs when he starts IDLE. Now that the code has ran, he tries to use the name soup, but it is nowhere to be found since it was defined solely inside that code that already ran. –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 22:22
    
@mmgp: No, that is not what he writes. You haven't not read the question carefully. He clearly states "if I use the code as is when I use print(soup.prettify())I get nothing returned but a blank line". He has access to soup, but it is the empty BeautifulSoup() object that he instantiates the global with. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 7 '12 at 22:31
    
See: "How can I make the soup object persist outside of my script?" –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 22:32

Two questions in one it looks like.

The first question regarding code to be executed on startup is solved by creating the modules usercustomize/sitecustomize in some directory according to http://docs.python.org/dev/library/site.html.

Now the second question can be solved by augmenting __builtin__:

import __builtin__
setattr(__builtin__, 'soup', soup)

on the startup module (in the appropriate place) and then soup will be magically available everywhere else. I don't recommend doing this, you might need to rethink what you want to achieve. Also, in your current approach, you redefine soup inside soupSetup. So, inside that function you need to specify that you are redefining a global variable and not creating a local one:

def soupSetup(...):
    global soup
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
This horrid hack may solve the problem, but it is not the correct solution in this case, as his problem is that he expects a global variable to be updated in a function, which it will not do. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 7 '12 at 22:01
    
Care to explain how this answer doesn't handle the update of the global variable ? The question asked indirectly for this hack, because he wants to further export the global soup. –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 22:07
    
He already has access to the global soup. "if I use the code as is when I use print(soup.prettify())I get nothing returned but a blank line." You need to re-read the question, carefully. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 7 '12 at 22:30
    
I would have no doubt of that if he said he wanted to persist soup outside of the given function, because then it is entirely different. –  mmgp Dec 7 '12 at 22:44
    
OK, you are new here, so I'll explain: When a newbie to Python comes in and explains what he wants to do, he is often wrong, because he is a newbie and have misunderstood something or is using the wrong terminology. This is the case here. From his description of the error it is completely clear that soup does "persist outside the script". So when he says that he wants soup to persist outside of the script, he has misunderstood what is happening. And since you listen to his incorrect analysis, so did you. I on the other hand, read his question carefully. You should to. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 8 '12 at 9:23

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