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If you can definitely prove that a method has no linearization points, does it necessarily mean that that method is not linearizable? Also, as a sub question, how can you prove that a method has no linearizatioon points?

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2 Answers 2

If you can definitely prove that a method has no linearization points, does it necessarily 
mean that that method is not linearizable? 

Firstly, linearizability is not property of a method, it is property of execution sequence.

how can you prove that a method has no linearizatioon points?

It depends on the execution sequence whether we are able to find linearization point for the method or not.

For example, we have the below sequence, for thread A on a FIFO queue. t1, t2, t3 are time intervals.

A.enq(1)   A.enq(2)   A.deq(1)
     t1          t2                t3

We can choose linearization points(lp) for first two enq methods as any points in time interval t1 and t2 respectively, and for deq any point in t3. The points that we choose are lp for these methods.

Now, consider a faulty implementation

A.enq(1)   A.enq(2)    A.deq(2)
    t1           t2                 t3

Linerizability allows lp to respect the real-time ordering. Therefore, lp of the methods should follow the time ordering i.e. t1 < t2 < t3. However, since our implementation is incorrect, we cannot clearly do this. Hence, we cannot find linearization point for the method A.deq(2), in turn our seq. too in not linerizable.

Hope this helps, if you need to know more you can read this book: http://www.amazon.com/Art-Multiprocessor-Programming-Maurice-Herlihy/dp/0123705916

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This answer is based on me reading about linearizability on wikipedia for the first time, and trying to map it to my existing understanding of memory consistency through happens-before relationships. So I may be misunderstanding the concept.

If you can definitely prove that a method has no linearization points, does it necessarily mean that that method is not linearizable?

It is possible to have a scenario where shared, mutable state is concurrently operated on by multiple threads without any synchronization or visibility aids, and still maintain all invariants without risk of corruption.

However, those cases are very rare.

how can you prove that a method has no linearizatioon points?

As I understand linearization points, and I may be wrong here, they are where happens-before relationships are established between threads. If a method (recursively through every method it calls in turn) establishes no such relationships, then I would assert that it has no linearizatioon points.

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Thanks! That helped a little... It's still a mystery to me, though :P –  pypmannetjies Sep 4 '09 at 8:22

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