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If I run the tests below on this code, it returns

 ALERT: an event that always happens

I expected it to also put

 ALERT: an event that never happens

but it didn't. I assume the reason for the difference is the 'true' and 'false' in the respective tests, but I don't see why 'true' or 'false' make a difference in this case. The method 'event' says

puts "ALERT: #{name}" if yield

If the result of the tests is explained by the fact that 'true' equals 'yield' in this context, whereas 'false' doesn't, how does 'false' negate 'yield'?

Question: Does 'if yield' mean 'yield if the block evaluates to true'?

code

def event(name)
  puts "ALERT: #{name}" if yield
end

Dir.glob('*events.rb').each {|file| load file }

tests

event "an event that always happens" do
  true                     
end

event "an event that never happens" do
  false                       
end

Output

ALERT: an event that always happens
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This might be helpful.

def event(name)
  val = yield
  puts val.inspect
  puts "ALERT: #{name}" if val == "donald"
end

event "an event that always happens" do
  "donald"
end

event "an event that never happens" do
  "duck"
end

prints

"donald"
ALERT: an event that always happens
"duck"

Basically the return value of yield is whatever gets evaluated last in the block. And that is what is being used as a criteria in the if statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Remember also that only nil and false are going to evaluate as false. Everything else, including 0, an empty string, an empty array, or an empty hash, will evaluate as true. – tadman Dec 7 '12 at 5:55

Question: Does 'if yield' mean 'yield if the block evaluates to true'?

No, if yield means if ((result of executing the block)), that is to say that the block is always evaluated, and its result is used as the condition of the if statement.

puts "..." if yield means "puts only if true". It is equivalent to

if yield
then
    puts "ALERT: #{name}"

That's why you see only one output. With the second event invocation, puts is not executed at all because of if false. Try this :

def event(name)
    result = yield
    puts "the block is #{result}"
    puts "ALERT: #{name}" if result
end

$ ruby -w t.rb 
the block is true
ALERT: an event that always happens
the block is false
$
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