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Why below code is not printing dates but integers?

> for (t in seq(as.Date('20090101','%Y%m%d'),as.Date('20090105','%Y%m%d'),1 ))
+ {
+   print(t)
+ }
[1] 14245
[1] 14246
[1] 14247
[1] 14248
[1] 14249
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marked as duplicate by Joshua Ulrich, Arun, Roman Luštrik, joran, Gavin Simpson Apr 10 '13 at 22:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As suggested by @flodel , the for loop preserve the Type and not the class:

h <- seq(as.Date('20090101','%Y%m%d'),as.Date('20090105','%Y%m%d'),1)
 class(h)
[1] "Date"
> typeof(h)
[1] "double"

Work around :

Use the vectorize version :

print(seq(as.Date('20090101','%Y%m%d'),as.Date('20090105','%Y%m%d'),1 ))

or loop over the sequence indices and retrieve the date with [:

for (i in seq_along(h)) {
    dt <- h[i]
    print(dt)
}


[1] "2009-01-01"
[1] "2009-01-02"
[1] "2009-01-03"
[1] "2009-01-04"
[1] "2009-01-05"
share|improve this answer
    
any idea about the "why" part of the question? –  flodel Dec 7 '12 at 5:22
    
Honesty No. maybe because the internal representation of class date as a number. –  agstudy Dec 7 '12 at 5:25
2  
found the answer here. for preserves the type, not the class. It also suggests to loop over the indices in the sequence as a workaround. –  flodel Dec 7 '12 at 5:32
    
@flodel thanks! I think it is better to put this in a real answer :) –  agstudy Dec 7 '12 at 5:36

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