Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to parse the following string with sscanf:

query=testword&diskimg=simple.img

How can I use sscanf to parse out "testword" and "simple.img"? The delimiter arguments for sscanf really confuse me :/

Thank you!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

If you know that the length of "testword" will always be 8 characters, you can do it like this:

char str[] = "query=testword&diskimg=simple.img";
char buf1[100];
char buf2[100];

sscanf(str, "query=%8s&diskimg=%s", buf1, buf2);

buf1 will now contain "testword" and buf2 will contain "simple.img".

Alternatively, if you know that testword will always be preceded by = and followed by &, and that simple.img will always be preceded by =, you can use this:

sscanf(str, "%*[^=]%*c%[^&]%*[^=]%*c%s", buf1, buf2);

It's pretty cryptic, so here's the summary: each % designates the start of a chunk of text. If there's a * following the %, that means that we ignore that chunk and don't store it in one of our buffers. The ^ within the brackets means that this chunk contains any number of characters that are not the characters within the brackets (excepting ^ itself). %s reads a string of arbitrary length, and %c reads a single character.

So to sum up:

  • We keep reading and ignoring characters if they are not =.
  • We read and ignore another character (the equal sign).
  • Now we're at testword, so we keep reading and storing characters into buf1 until we encounter the & character.
  • More characters to read and ignore; we keep going until we hit = again.
  • We read and ignore a single character (again, the equal sign).
  • Finally, we store what's left ("simple.img") into buf2.
share|improve this answer
    
Very elegant solution, I like it! –  Justin D. Nov 16 '13 at 4:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.