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I'm working on a site that pulls data from a third party site. My PHP pulls the data and responds with a really nice JSON object. I then use $.each to iterate over the object and sort through the data which works great. The problem is I dont know how to pull the main property.

Example JSON response:

{
    "1234": {
        "all_sales": {"11/12/2012":"1211.33","11/13/2012":"2012.45"},
        "sales_total":"323.78",
        "store_number":"1234",
    },
     "5678": {
        "all_sales": {"11/12/2012":"1211.33","11/13/2012":"2012.45"},
        "sales_total":"323.78",
        "store_number":"5678",
    },

}

1234 and 5678 are store numbers. What I want is to not need the store_number property and just know thats what it is. In PHP it would be something like:

for ($data as $store_number => $store_data){
    //do whatever
}

Im doing this for all sorts of reasons, but mainly so I can simply call data.1234 or build an array of sales for like a top 10. For now the store_number property lets me do this but its extra data that isn't needed.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

for x in loops are the right tool for the job here. I like jQuery, but don't whip out the JQ-hammer when JavaScript has it covered.

var myObj = {
    "1234": {
        "all_sales": {"11/12/2012":"1211.33","11/13/2012":"2012.45"},
        "sales_total":"323.78",
        "store_number":"1234",
    },
     "5678": {
        "all_sales": {"11/12/2012":"1211.33","11/13/2012":"2012.45"},
        "sales_total":"323.78",
        "store_number":"5678",
    },

}

for (var x in myObj) {
    alert('property:' + x);
    alert('property.sales_total:' + myObj[x].sales_total); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Might want to use if (myObj.hasOwnProperty(x)) {} also then :) –  Ian Dec 7 '12 at 6:17
    
For an object literal? Not necessary to my knowledge. –  Erik Reppen Dec 7 '12 at 6:18
    
Compared to what else? –  Ian Dec 7 '12 at 6:22
    
@ErikReppen on rare occasions yes (Object.prototype.foo="bar") –  Christophe Dec 7 '12 at 6:22
    
@Ian Compared to an object created by a function constructor which could have properties from the constructor prototype defined as enumerable, which a typical literal wouldn't. –  Erik Reppen Dec 7 '12 at 6:23

If I understand correctly, you want an array with the values '1234', '5678', etc.:

myArray=$.map(myJSON,function(value,key){return key;});

[Edit] On second thoughts, this might be closer to what you're after:

myArray=$.map(myJSON,function(value,key){
// do whatever
});

And as @Ian said in the comment, you might want to group all your processing in a single loop (either $.each or $.map as in my example).

share|improve this answer
    
I definitely like this too, and it's confusing how the OP is handling these loop(s), but it might make sense to combine all logic into one loop instead of just getting an array of the keys (depending on which works better for the OP). I only say this because they use the for loop example with PHP of just iterating over the keys (not storing them). I always love map though –  Ian Dec 7 '12 at 6:29
    
Its confusing but because you cant sort objects I build arrays based on their sales totals and then I can sort that array into different orders, say DSC by sales total. Then I can call that sorted array and it returns the store number for that position so I can then call that store and get all of its data... I may be WAY over complicating it but its working pretty well at the moment.. –  Dennis Smolek Dec 19 '12 at 0:03
    
@DennisSmolek it makes perfect sense... now that you explain your reasons :-). And my first snippet does exactly what you're looking for, in just one line! –  Christophe Dec 19 '12 at 0:17
for (var key in object) {
    console.log(key);
}
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I think you want to use the first argument of the $.each callback function:

var a = { "1234": { ... }, "5678": { ... } };

$.each(a, function(main, val) {
    console.log(main); // prints "1234" and "5678"
});
share|improve this answer
    
In my opinion using $.each is heavy handed here. Javascript provides the in operator that can be used in a native for loop. for (var key in object) {} –  Brian Cray Dec 7 '12 at 6:22
1  
They said that they're already using $.each to iterate over the object in the question, which is why I used it in my answer. If they weren't already using it, I'd agree, just using for and in would be easier. –  Xymostech Dec 7 '12 at 6:25
    
If the author answered it, it would bug me less than having 0 whereas the JQ answer gets 3+. It's getting kinda silly on the JQ vs JS front when JS is actually easier. No sour grapes @Xymostech or at JQ though. –  Erik Reppen Dec 7 '12 at 6:31
    
This works for sure, I didn't realize you could pass them with the callback function. I would take this as the correct answer but using the plain for loop is a lighter approach. –  Dennis Smolek Dec 18 '12 at 23:54

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