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For example, suppose we have two functions:

void sum(int x, int y)
{
   return x+y;
}

void minus(int x, int y)
{
   return x-y;
}

Is there a way to make a single function that does a sum or minus (or various other things) depending on which you want to use (perhaps by a keyword of some sort) without having to write separate functions explicitly?

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4  
These are already written for you in <functional>. You can use a switch or a map to relate them to something else. –  chris Dec 7 '12 at 6:26
3  
A switch on an enum would be a pretty simple solution. –  Borgleader Dec 7 '12 at 6:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some one kind of beat me to this with the comments below the question, but here ya go!

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>

std::unordered_map<std::string, std::function<int(int,int)>> operations =
{
  { "plus",   std::plus<int>()  },
  { "minus",  std::minus<int>() }
  // etc etc
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  std::cout << operations["plus"](1, 2) << std::endl;
  std::cout << operations["minus"](2, 1) << std::endl;

}
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Is it that you don't want to write separate functions, or that you want to call one thing from the call site? If you don't mind writing a little bit more, you can use operator objects:

class Add {
  public:
  int operator(int a, int b) {
    return a+b:
  }
};

class Mul {
  public:
  int operator(int a, int b) {
    return a*b:
  }
};

template <class Op>
int doMyStuff(Op op, int a, int b) {
  return op(a,b);
}

// and you can call it like this:
doMyStuff(Add(),2,4);

This pattern is particularly useful when you implement certain transformations that do not rely on particular operator, but just on certain property of the operator. For example, you could implement an array-summator which either sums all elements of an array, or computes a product of all elements in array: the loop remains the same, it's just the operator that changes.

template <class Op>
int summator(Op op, int* arr, int size) {
  int v = arr[0];
  for (int i=1; i<size; ++i) {
    v = op(v,arr[i]);
  }
  return v;
}

...

summator(Add(),myarray,10); //sum all elements
summator(Mul(),myarray,10); //product of all elements
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1  
It is probably worth pointing out that the standard library already provides function types for the arithmetic operations +, -, /, *. –  juanchopanza Dec 7 '12 at 7:00
    
I guess, that + and - are merely an example of what Bob John wants to do. –  Spook Dec 7 '12 at 7:03
    
You can use much more complex operator (e.g. matrix multiplication) and the summator will still work (you just need to replace int with underlying type T of whatever operation you do) –  CygnusX1 Dec 7 '12 at 10:40

I assume the function is actually a bit more beefy than the one you posted (which don't compile returning a value from a function returning void). You could use function objects to customize the behavior, e.g.:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std::placeholders;

template <typename Op>
int operation(int a0, int a1, Op op = Op())
{
    return op(a0, a1);
}

int my_f0(int a0, int a2)
{
    return 2 * a0 + 3 * a2;
}

int my_f2(int a0, int a2, int f0, int f1)
{
    return f0 * a0 + f1 * a2;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << operation<std::plus<int> >(2, 3) << "\n";
    std::cout << operation<std::minus<int> >(2, 3) << "\n";
    std::cout << operation(2, 3, std::multiplies<int>()) << "\n";
    std::cout << operation(2, 3, my_f0) << "\n";
    std::cout << operation(2, 3, std::bind(&my_f2, _1, _2, 2, 3)) << "\n";
}

The customized function is operation(). The other code is just to show how it gets customized. The standard library algorithms use this approach all over the place.

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If you don't believe macros are evil from hell, you could do this:

#define DEFINE_OPERATION(maName, maOp) \
  inline int maName (int a, int b) { return a maOp b; }

DEFINE_OPERATION(add, +)
DEFINE_OPERATION(sub, -)

#undef DEFINE_OPERATION

Or even:

#include <boost/preprocessor.hpp>

#define OPERATIONS ((add, +))((sub, -))

#define DEFINE_OPERATION(maR, maData, maElem) \
  inline int BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 0, maElem) (int a, int b) { return a BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 1, maEleme) b; }

BOOST_PP_SEQ_FOR_EACH(OPERATIONS, unused_, DEFINE_OPERATION)

#undef DEFINE_OPERATION
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#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

template<template<class> class OP, class T> 
T do_op(T a, T b) {
    return  OP<T>()(a,b);
}

int main () {
    cout << do_op<plus>       (3,2) << endl;
    cout << do_op<minus>      (3,2) << endl;
    cout << do_op<multiplies> (3,2) << endl;
    cout << do_op<divides>    (3,2) << endl;
}
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1  
The int arguments are redundant here since T is a deduced parameter. –  MSalters Dec 7 '12 at 9:22
    
Yep, it was redundant. Fixed. –  Leonid Volnitsky Dec 7 '12 at 10:13
    
From my experience, it is better to pass an operator as an object, rather than class (see my answer) because an operator may store some helpful run-time parameters within itself. –  CygnusX1 Dec 7 '12 at 10:42
    
We do not need to store any info in parameters. And I am passing op in compile time, and you do at run time, which is usually slower. –  Leonid Volnitsky Dec 7 '12 at 14:35

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