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I am building a backend module (written in PHP) that will be used for monitoring private chat rooms that has no activity for [Exactly] 300 seconds (5 minutes). If it is, the script will update the database (sets the max users to a certain number, and other stuffs). I am monitoring the span of idle time by the time difference of now() and last message sent.


What I did: set a cron job that will run (through php-cli) my monitoring script every minute or 60 seconds. Inside the monitoring script:

$expire_time = time() + 60;

//this loop will run for 60 seconds
while(time() < $expire_time)
{
  $idle_time = get_all_chatrooms_idle_time();
  foreach($idle_time as $s_time)
  {
    if($s_time >= 300)
    {
      update_changes();
    }
  }
  usleep(500000);
}

The condition of instantly setting max users after 300 seconds idle time can't be bargained. So I cant really follow advice like: "avoid doing anything until something actually asks for it" even though it makes a lot of sense.

Reason? The data of active and inactive chatrooms need to be real time because it will also be displayed on a dashboard. The chatroom moderators' pay depends on it.


Why not check them every dashboard load? I'm sorry but still not possible.

The checking needs to be server side and the dashboard updates itself with ajax, polling every second.

When I attach the monitoring code to the page being requested by my ajax calls I think it's more resource intensive than my current implementation (correct me if Im wrong)

Let me give you some rough estimate on the number of users so you can imagine the load/traffic we're getting:

  • number of chatters including moderators: ~800
  • number of chatrooms: ~250
  • (x) number of chatroom moderators: ~50
  • (x) my boss and his staff:

(x) - can view the dashboard


Is there a better way? Am I doing it right?

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seems like you're doing it wrong. Have ever hear about CRON jobs? I think godd way to do that is to set up cron job for every 1 minute (or less)? that will run simple MySQL script with select. –  Stranger Dec 7 '12 at 7:18
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4834829/… –  Benjamin Paap Dec 7 '12 at 7:21
    
@Stranger I did? –  yowmamasita Dec 7 '12 at 7:25
    
hm... what? o.O –  Stranger Dec 7 '12 at 7:26
    
It sounds like PHP is the wrong tool for the job. PHP does server side scripting of stateless systems really well, but once you introduce this level of real-time complexity into the equation, you're forced to do things like a unix cron-job, a pseudo cron (like what you're doing), and other hack-around solutions to getting a script to execute on a timer, PHP falls short. –  SamT Dec 7 '12 at 7:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This loop is an overkill. It may run many thousand times a minute, even on a moderate server, and it generates high CPU usage even for a realtime-app. Add a counter, and see iteration count. I think this generates even more load than processing upon every AJAX request.

First of all, determine the granularity you need the information with. Suppose you choose to have 3 seconds of granularity (e.g. sweeping through the database every 3 seconds) - this number may be too high for you, but it illustrates that you don't lose much. With AJAX pulling every second you COULD see some counters that should crawl up continuously crawl back once or twice. (Whether you will really see such thing depends on the nature of your counters.)

If your counters are based on data in range of seconds (e.g. showing sums of elapsed seconds, or amounts based on $/sec) then second-wise AJAX pulling will not provide continuous counters. (It will sometimes miss a second or update to that second twice; for network reasons).

Regardless of the chosen granularity, your final statistics will be allright, because they are based on absolute timestamps - no matter how late they are evaluated.

If second-wise AJAX poll is used to implement smooth counter, than you can do much better than that: counting should run on the client side (e.g. sending values with their second-wise increment: revenue: <span data-inc="25">14432</span> and counting with JS). The only implement AJAX to monitor the condition of stopping/reseting counters. Then you only need to determine how long notification may be late (e.g. 10s) then counters will overscroll for max. 10s the drop back to the expected value. In this case you should not run DB cleanup much more often (e.g. half of the interval). That allows e.g. for a 3-second sleep in your cycle, which decreases load drastically.

If you can easily opt for adding the expiration timestamp of every chatroom to the database (either in-record or fixed) with an index that would speed up reading a bit (and additionally allow for per-room expiration rules).

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1  
PHP can do the job if you want to use it for example to have easy access to BL code already written. It only has issues with running continuously as a service (a service for realtime tracking). On a system, where you can kill the runtime restriction for at least this script, you're set: create a logic that sleep()s until the next possible event [e.g. next expiration or smallest possible expiration period]. If you must live with runtime-restriction you still can use the scheme you use now (cron every min a script that quits after one min) just add some sleep()! –  Levente Pánczél Dec 7 '12 at 7:48
    
I am really sorry but the code has usleep(500000) that I forgot to add. The 500ms sleep is based on the average latency of our server to most of our clients. So... loop: max of 2 calls per sec, ajax poll: if there are 60 viewers, 60 calls per sec. –  yowmamasita Dec 7 '12 at 7:51
1  
OK, and you're on the right track with that. The suggestions about client-side counting to allow for lowering the latency of checks still applies. Independently, the possibility for sleeping until the next possible event also applies: if your select says that the next expiration is after X sec (take a large value, if there currently is no open chatroom), and the minimum expiration time in the system (even counting possible rooms being created) is Y sec then you may sleep min(X,Y) without any need to re-run checking; and then check, possibly process, and determine a new X. –  Levente Pánczél Dec 7 '12 at 7:57

I per the comment, I recommend using a technology such as node.js, which is an even-driven I/O, asynchronous platform to build applications on. If the chatroom is an external application, you can easily open up a socket and listen to the chatroom, logging it, checking up on users' activity, and listen for specific events.

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(am I doing this right?) On chat message enter, cleartimeout of function update_max_users(), settimeout update_max_users() to 300sec –  yowmamasita Dec 7 '12 at 8:04
#!/usr/bin/php
<?php

if( file_exists('/tmp/chatrooms_cron.lock') ) {
   die( 'There is already a script running.' );
}

file_put_contents( '/tmp/chatrooms_cron.lock', 1 ); // Storing pid would be better 

// Run loop forever
while( true )
{
  $idle_time = get_all_chatrooms_idle_time();

  foreach($idle_time as $s_time)
  {
    if($s_time >= 300)
    {
      update_changes();
    }
  }

  sleep( 60 );
}

Tip for node.js (with socket.io):

I've been using node.js at work at its great! Will be realtime and work with browsers down to ie5/ie6. This could be done internally in node.js.

setInterval( function() {
   // Fetch and update peers
}, 300000 );
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