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I have written a BubbleSort program and it works great, gives me a good output and does its job sufficiently. But I am unable to make the program re-execute after sorting through once. I.e. the program completes a sort of 10000 unique numbers and outputs the time it takes and the amount of steps it took, but doesn't execute again, say for another 999 times after that?

In short, can anyone help me get my program to run through itself 1000 times so I am able to get an average of execution time?

Here is the code:

public class BubbleSort {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      int BubArray[] = new int[] { #10000 unique values unsorted# };

      System.out.println("Array Before Bubble Sort");
      for (int a = 0; a < BubArray.length; a++) {
         System.out.print(BubArray[a] + " ");
      }

      double timeTaken = bubbleSortTimeTaken(BubArray);
      int itrs = bubbleSort(BubArray);
      System.out.println("");
      System.out.println("Array After Bubble Sort");
      System.out.println("Moves Taken for Sort : " + itrs + " moves.");
      System.out.println("Time Taken for Sort : " + timeTaken
            + " milliseconds.");
      for (int a = 0; a < BubArray.length; a++) {
         System.out.print(BubArray[a] + " ");
      }
   }

   private static int bubbleSort(int[] BubArray) {

      int z = BubArray.length;
      int temp = 0;

      int itrs = 0;

      for (int a = 0; a < z; a++) {
         for (int x = 1; x < (z - a); x++) {

            if (BubArray[x - 1] > BubArray[x]) {

               temp = BubArray[x - 1];
               BubArray[x - 1] = BubArray[x];
               BubArray[x] = temp;

            }

            itrs++;
         }
      }

      return itrs;
   }

   public static double bubbleSortTimeTaken(int[] BubArray) {
      long startTime = System.nanoTime();
      bubbleSort(BubArray);
      long timeTaken = System.nanoTime() - startTime;
      return timeTaken;
   }
}

and here are the results output (note it is limited to just one run):

Unsorted List : 
[13981, 6793, 2662, 733, 2850, 9581, 7744 .... ]
Sorted List with BubbleSort

Moves Taken to Sort : 1447551 Moves.
Time Taken to Sort : 1.2483121E7 Milliseconds.

[10, 11, 17, 24, 35, 53, 57, 60, 78, 89, 92 ... ]
share|improve this question
1  
what is the issue in extracting main() code in a new method and calling the same 1000 times? –  vishal_aim Dec 7 '12 at 8:27
    
What have you tried to make the program execute multiple times? –  Andreas Dec 7 '12 at 8:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edited code...

public class BubbleSort {
    static double bestTime = 10000000, worstTime = 0;  //global variables
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int BubArray[] = new int[]{3,5,3,2,5,7,2,5,8};

    System.out.println("Array Before Bubble Sort");
    for(int a = 0; a < BubArray.length; a++){
    System.out.print(BubArray[a] + " ");

    }

  System.out.println("\n Entering Loop...");

  for(int i=0; i<1000;i++)
  {  
  bubbleSortTimeTaken(BubArray, i);
  }


        int itrs = bubbleSort(BubArray);
        System.out.println("");               
        System.out.println("Array After Bubble Sort");
        System.out.println("Moves Taken for Sort : " + itrs + " moves.");
        System.out.println("BestTime: " + bestTime + " WorstTime: " + worstTime);
        System.out.print("Sorted Array: \n");
            for(int a = 0; a < BubArray.length; a++){
                    System.out.print(BubArray[a] + " ");
            }
    }

 private static int bubbleSort(int[] BubArray) {

    int z = BubArray.length;
    int temp = 0;

    int itrs = 0;

    for(int a = 0; a < z; a++){
            for(int x=1; x < (z-a); x++){

                    if(BubArray[x-1] > BubArray[x]){

                            temp = BubArray[x-1];
                            BubArray[x-1] = BubArray[x];
                            BubArray[x] = temp;
                    }    

                    itrs++;
            }
    }

    return itrs;
}

public static void bubbleSortTimeTaken(int[] BubArray, int n) 
{

     long startTime = System.nanoTime();

     bubbleSort(BubArray);   

     double timeTaken = (System.nanoTime() - startTime)/1000000d;

     if(timeTaken > 0)
     {
         if(timeTaken > worstTime)
         {
             worstTime = timeTaken;
         }
         else if(timeTaken < bestTime)
         {
             bestTime = timeTaken;
         }

     }

     System.out.println("Loop number: "+n + " Time Taken: " + timeTaken);


}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way instead of BubArray = new int {array ints}; ... to say, call the BubArray again (999 times) and calculate each time ... so 1000 different amounts of "Time Taken" and "Moves Taken", does that make sense? –  a.ymous Dec 7 '12 at 8:45
    
the value of BubArray is going to change everytime it enters the loop? if yes, then how? randomly? –  BLOB Dec 7 '12 at 8:51
    
I mean the same 10000 unique values for each execution, but I need to calculate the average time for 1000 executions. "You can measure how long it takes to sort the data 1,000 times, then divide this time by 1,000 to get an average for running the sort once." . It's to plot on a graph to find Worst, Avg, Best Case. –  a.ymous Dec 7 '12 at 8:54
    
and the code is printing out time in nanoseconds.. u need to divide by 10^6 to get time in millis –  BLOB Dec 7 '12 at 8:54
    
so.. u want to run the bubbleSort 1000 times and u need the exectution time for every time it runs and find the best and worst possible execution times right? –  BLOB Dec 7 '12 at 8:59

Move the method below

private static int bubbleSort(int[] BubArray) 

in to some other class extending Thread. May be you can create new threads each time execution finishes. A static instance variable in root class can be used to hold the times.

share|improve this answer
    
Threading does not seem to be a requirement in the question. No need to add unnecessary complexity. –  Andreas Dec 7 '12 at 8:29

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