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I am new to using Mocks. But what are it's main purposes? I'm going to start by using Moq to test my application (and NUnit).

For example, I have code that does things like this:

My webpage code behind:

public partial class MyWebpage
{
    protected string GetTitle(string myVar)
    {
        return dataLayer.GetTitle(myVar);
    }
}

My data access layer:

public class DataLayer
{
    public string GetTitle(string myVar)
    {
        // Create the query we want
        string query = "SELECT title FROM MyTable " + 
            "WHERE var = @myVar";

        //ENTER PARAMETERS IN HERE

        // Now return the result to the view
        return this.dataProvider.ExecuteMySelectQuery(
            dr =>
            {
               //DELEGATE DATA READER PASSED IN AND TITLE GETS RETURNED
            },
            query,
            parameters);
    }
}

My data provider talks and interacts directly with the db:

 public class DataProvider
{
     public T ExecuteMySelectQuery<T>(Func<IDataReader, T> getMyResult, string selectQuery, Dictionary parameters)
    {
          //RUNS AND RETURNS THE QUERY
     }
}

What's the best way to test all of this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to test the layers separately, you would need to create interfaces for your DataProvider and DataLayer classes that expose the methods that you want to Mock. Then you can use a mocking framework - NSubstitute is very good, less code to write to create the mocks - to mock out the calls to the dependent classes, leaving you to test the code within that specific unit

public interface IDataProvider
{
     T ExecuteMySelectQuery<T>(Func<IDataReader, T> getMyResult, string selectQuery, Dictionary parameters);
}

public interface IDataLayer
{
    string GetTitle(string myVar);
}

public class DataLayer 
{
    private IDataProvider dataProvider;

    public DataLayer(IDataProvider dataProvider)
    {
        this.dataProvider = dataProvider;
    }
}

Then, in your test code, you create mocks instead of real objects and pass those into the constructor when you instantiate your test objects. To test the DataLayer:

[Test]
public void WhenRetievingTitleFromDataStore_ThenDataLayerReturnsTitle() 
{
    var title = "Title";
    var dataProviderMock = new Mock<IDataProvider>(MockBehavior.Strict);
    dataProviderMock.Setup(x => x.ExecuteMySelectQuery(<parameters>)).Returns(title);
    var dataLayer = new DataLayer(dataProviderMock.Object);
    Assert.That(dataLayer.GetTitle(It.IsAny<string>(), Is.EqualTo(title));
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah i have interfaces for them like you do above (was just cutting down on the code in the post), how would you test your code above? –  chris Dec 7 '12 at 8:43
    
Using MOQ, you could create a mock of the IDataProvider interface like this: Mock<IDataProvider> dataProviderMock = new Mock<IDataProvider>(MockBehavior.Strict); and pass it to the data layer like this: var dataLayer = new DataLayer(dataProviderMock.Object); –  levelnis Dec 7 '12 at 8:44
    
yeah alright i will test this out. thx. And then I could use the dataLayer object to test that part out, like dataLayer.GetTitle()? –  chris Dec 7 '12 at 8:47
1  
Is it an input parameter that doesn't affect anything outside of the GetTitle method? If you don't care about the value of it you could use Moq's It.IsAny<string>() - will update the test. If you need to pass it through to the ExecuteMySelectQuery method, you can create a constant in the test for that value, and use that to represent the parameter passed in to ExecuteMySelectQuery. You then pass that specific constant value in to GetTitle. If that string is not the same when ExecuteMySelectQuery is called, the mock will fail. –  levelnis Dec 7 '12 at 9:02
1  
@jgauffin the test verifies that DataLayer collaborates with its DataProvider correctly, and more precisely, that it is able to handle the return value "Title" from the DataProvider. –  guillaume31 Dec 7 '12 at 10:04

The only thing that can go wrong with that is the DB call (the query or the returned result is of wrong data types). That can't be mocked. You need to do integration tests and not unit tests.

Typically you only mock to be able to test logic in the code. You should for instance test so that the data mapper (this.dataProvider.ExecuteMySelectQuery) works as defined. but that's of the scope of the code in question.

Update

So you got the following classes:

public class DataLayer
{
    public string GetTitle(string myVar)
    {
        // Create the query we want
        string query = "SELECT title FROM MyTable " + 
            "WHERE var = @myVar";

        //ENTER PARAMETERS IN HERE

        // Now return the result to the view
        return this.dataProvider.ExecuteMySelectQuery(
            dr =>
            {
               //DELEGATE DATA READER PASSED IN AND TITLE GETS RETURNED
            },
            query,
            parameters);
    }
}

public class DataProvider
{
     public T ExecuteMySelectQuery<T>(Func<IDataReader, T> getMyResult, string selectQuery, Dictionary parameters)
    {
          //RUNS AND RETURNS THE QUERY
     }
}

If we examine the ExecuteMySelectQuery we can see that the DataLayer class is dependent of how the types that the database returns since the DataProvider just ease the query execution. One could say that it's an addon on top of ADO.NET.

That also means that you can never guarantee that DataLayer return what's promised without involving the database. Let's for instance assume that the table in the database has a column called title but someone managed to use the int data type instead.

The things that can go wrong are

  • The query is incorrect
  • The schema in the database is incorrect (wrong column names, data types etc)
  • The mapping

None of those errors can be detected nor tested with the help of a mock.

If you on the other hand use the DataLayer clas in another class you can of course mock it. Because the DataLayer class itself is a complete abstraction. That means that the callers of the class doesn't have to be aware of anything beneath it. Hence mocking is perfectly fine.

share|improve this answer
    
so no unit tests for any of the code above? –  chris Dec 7 '12 at 8:39
    
no. I don't see the point. The code doesn't do anything. The only thing that could go wrong is what I said. –  jgauffin Dec 7 '12 at 9:14
    
This is one approach. Others will test every interaction between an object and its dependencies. I guess it all boils down to what you consider is "logic", and consequently worth testing. –  guillaume31 Dec 7 '12 at 10:20
    
See my comment to your comment on the other answer. –  jgauffin Dec 7 '12 at 10:25

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