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I am new to bash and having a tough time figuring this out.

Using sed, could anyone help me in finding only even numbers in a given file?

I figured out how to find all numbers starting from [0,2,4,6,8] using this:

sed -n 's/^[0-9]*[02468] /&/w even' <file 

But this doesn't guarantee that the number is even for sure.

I am having trouble in finding if the matched number ends with either [0,2,4,6,8] for it to be even for sure.

So can any one help me out with this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your regex looks a bit weird and I am not sure what you want to do, but this should help:

sed -r -n 's/^[0-9]*?[02468] /even/g'

-r to enable extended regex, *? to make it non-greedy, and /g to perform replacement globally for all lines in file.

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Firstly I think you may be confusing perl with sed as far as I know sed has no such non-greedy operator. Secondly as you have invoked -n nothing will be printed as the p flag is not present in the substitute command. Lastly, it is unclear but I believe the @user445687 wanted those lines beginning with an even number or the number itself, to be written to a file called even. –  potong Dec 7 '12 at 14:17

Your command should work fine assuming that there is a space after all even numbers and that they are all at the beginning of the lines:

$ echo 'foo 
1231 
2220 
1254 ' | sed -n '/[0-9]*[02468] /p'
2220 
1254 

Also note that, as you don't actually do a substitution, you don't need the s command. Use an address (pattern) specifier and w command (like I did above with the p command).

To make sure that the even digit is the last, but is not necessarily followed by a space, you can do something like

$ echo 'foo
1231
2220
1254 ' | sed -n '/[0-9]*[02468]\($\|[^0-9]\)/p'
2220
1254 

Actually, your case looks more like a use case for grep, not sed, because you do filtering rather than editing. Everything becomes easier with GNU grep, as you can do

$ echo 'foo
1231
2220
1254 ' | grep -P '\d*[02468](?!\d)'
2220
1254 

Just append > even to the command to make it write to the file even.

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$ cat file
1
2
3
498
57
12345678
$ awk '$0%2' file
1
3
57
$ awk '!($0%2)' file
2
498
12345678
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Why don't you find the numbers ending with [02468] ?

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