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I'm trying to create an instance of a class that I can add to a list in a generic way..

I know the type of class that needs to be made and i've been able to make an object of the class using the code below but I have not found a way to create a cast that will allow me to add this to a list.. any ideas?

T is the same as objType

public static List<T> LoadList(string fileName, Type objType)
{
    List<T> objList = new List<T>();
    object o = Activator.CreateInstance(objType);
    objList.Add((**o.GetType()**)o);
    return objList;
}

if theres a better way of doing this too im open to ideas :)

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1  
Is <type> the same as objType? –  Zach Johnson Dec 7 '12 at 8:40
    
yes zach sorry for confusion I'll change it either way.. –  Sayse Dec 7 '12 at 8:42
    
Given that, I suggest using type constraints. See my answer below. –  Zach Johnson Dec 7 '12 at 8:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just use the non-generic API:

((IList)objList).Add(o);

I'm also assuming that type is a generic type-parameter; just to say: type is confusing for this; T or TSomethingSpecific would be more idiomatic.

Also: this line needs fixing:

List<type> objList = new List<type>(); // <=== not new List<Object>
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well that was surprisingly simple.. thanks! sorry for the confusion on the list line i forgot to change it in my post above (Object is the class type in my list.. its different from System.Object and not my choice of name!) –  Sayse Dec 7 '12 at 8:40
1  
@Sayse ouch. I would keel-haul whoever made that naming choice ;p –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '12 at 9:17
    
+100 for the (well deserved) keel-haul. –  SWeko Dec 7 '12 at 9:36

Given that <type> is the same as objType, I'd suggest dropping the reflection and using the where T : new() type constraint:

public static List<T> LoadList(string fileName) 
    where T : new()
{
    List<T> objList = new List<T>();
    objList.add(new T());
    return objList;
}

Edit:

If objType is a subclass of T, then I think something along these lines should work:

public static List<TListType, T> LoadList(string fileName)
    where T : TListType, new()
{
    List<TListType> objList = new List<TListType>();
    objList.add(new T());
    return objList;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'll have a look into this way zach.. I'm unfamiliar with the 'where' attribute.. –  Sayse Dec 7 '12 at 8:54
    
@Sayse: They're pretty helpful because it means calls to the method or instances of the class can only have types that meet those minimum specifications. So you can call methods, etc that the minimum specification provide. –  Zach Johnson Dec 7 '12 at 8:57
    
Did you mean to declare LoadList<T> ? –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '12 at 9:17
    
It looks like in the edited question, T is not the same as objType - presumably a sub-type or concrete-type; so I'm not sure this would work. –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '12 at 9:19
    
As Marc has said this does not look suitable for my situation but I'll keep it in mind :) –  Sayse Dec 7 '12 at 9:23

You could user Zach Johnson's suggestion with the where constraint as it eliminates a duplicate specification of the type. However if the signature is set in stone, you could get by with a simple as cast, like:

public List<T> LoadList<T>(Type objType) where T : class
{
  List<T> objList = new List<T>();
  T item = (Activator.CreateInstance(objType) as T);
  objList.Add(item);
  return objList;
}

This also needs a where restriction, because in order to cast to a type, that type must be a reference type (aka class).

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To make things even more fun, T is a base class and the item needs to be one of the inherited items, I've used Marc Gravells answer in my project but I'm definately going to spend time looking into 'where' :) –  Sayse Dec 7 '12 at 10:28
1  
This will work in that case too, because as only changes the type of the reference, so it can be added to the collection. The actual type of the object is determined by the objType –  SWeko Dec 7 '12 at 10:31

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