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Can anyone help me compare an Integer to a Double using generics?

This is what I have:

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> int compare(T arg1, T arg2)
{
    return arg1.compareTo(arg2);
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{   
    Number i = new Integer(5);
    Number j = new Double(7);

    System.out.println(GenericsTest.compare(i, j));
}

The error message I get is: Bound mismatch: The generic method compare(T, T) of type GenericsTest is not applicable for the arguments (Number, Number). The inferred type Number is not a valid substitute for the bounded parameter >

share|improve this question
1  
docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Number.html Number does not extend Comparable? Could this be the reason for the exception? –  Fildor Dec 7 '12 at 9:03
    
But I want to compare different types which have the same supertype. How can I proceed? –  karakays Dec 7 '12 at 9:08
    
Then you cannot use Number. It does not meet your requirements for the supertype. You need the supertype to extend Comparable if you stick to your method. –  Fildor Dec 7 '12 at 9:11
1  
One side note, prefer using e.g. Integer.valueOf(5) instead of new Integer(5), this way you avoid allocating memory unnecessarily. See Effective Java. –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 10:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do something like this (now is cleaner but somehow formatting doesn't work), note you can reuse this static comparator without having to cast to double anywhere else. In the implementation you do need conversion to double not to lose information, basically you widden to the most general representation.

private static final Comparator<Number> NUMBER_COMPARATOR = new Comparator<Number>() {
    private BigDecimal createBigDecimal(Number value) {
        BigDecimal result = null;
        if (value instanceof Short) {
            result = BigDecimal.valueOf(value.shortValue());
        } else 
        if (value instanceof Long) {
            result = BigDecimal.valueOf(value.longValue());             
        } else 
        if (value instanceof Float) {
            result = BigDecimal.valueOf(value.floatValue());                                
        } else 
        if (value instanceof Double) {
            result = BigDecimal.valueOf(value.doubleValue());                               
        } else 
        if (value instanceof Integer) {
            result = BigDecimal.valueOf(value.intValue());                              
        } else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("unsupported Number subtype: " + value.getClass().getName());
        }
                       assert(result != null);

        return result;
    }

    public int compare(Number o1, Number o2) {
        return createBigDecimal(o1).compareTo(createBigDecimal(o2));
    };
};

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Number i = Integer.valueOf(5);
    Number j = Double.valueOf(7);
              // -1
    System.out.println(NUMBER_COMPARATOR.compare(i, j));

         i = Long.MAX_VALUE;
         j = Long.valueOf(7);
              // +1
         System.out.println(NUMBER_COMPARATOR.compare(i, j));

         i = Long.MAX_VALUE;
         j = Long.valueOf(-7);
              // +1
         System.out.println(NUMBER_COMPARATOR.compare(i, j));

         i = Long.MAX_VALUE;
         j = Double.MAX_VALUE;
              // -1
         System.out.println(NUMBER_COMPARATOR.compare(i, j));

    i = Long.MAX_VALUE;
    j = Long.valueOf(Long.MAX_VALUE - 1);
    // +1
    System.out.println(NUMBER_COMPARATOR.compare(i, j));

              // sorting Long values
    Long[] values = new Long[] {Long.valueOf(10), Long.valueOf(-1), Long.valueOf(4)};
    Arrays.sort(values, NUMBER_COMPARATOR);
              // [-1, 4, 10] 
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(values));  
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that it wont sort, say, Longs correctly. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 7 '12 at 10:00
    
really? how is that? see my edits, it works like a dream :X –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 10:05
1  
long and double are both 64-bit types. They represent different ranges of numbers. You can't map long into double losslessly. I believe Long.MAX_VALUE and Long.MAX_VALUE-1 will map into the same double, and therefore your Comparator wont be able to order them. Even if you compare both longValue and doubleValue that isn't going to cover other numbers, such as BigInteger and any third-party type. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 7 '12 at 10:56
    
true, indeed, I edited the impl widening to the highest range possible BigDecimal. I also included a test for the border case you suggested, bulletproof now? –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 11:11

As aready said in the comments, Number does not implement Comparable. But Double and Integer do.

One way to make this work is like this:

public static <T extends Comparable<? super T>> int compare(T arg1, T arg2)
{
    return arg1.compareTo(arg2);
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{   
    Double i = new Integer(5).doubleValue();
    Double j = new Double(7);

    System.out.println(GenericsTest.compare(i, j));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that my solution is better because you don't need to keep converting all the time you want to compare but it is done only once and encapsulated within the comparator itself. –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 9:33
    
It depends on the requerments of the PO,... –  Frank Dec 7 '12 at 9:34

Number doesn't implement Comparable.

Declare both variables as Integer.

share|improve this answer
private boolean compareObject(Object expected, Object actual) {
    if (expected instanceof Number && actual instanceof Number) {
        double e = ((Number) expected).doubleValue();
        double a = ((Number) actual).doubleValue();
        return e == a;
    } else {
        return com.google.common.base.Objects.equal(expected, actual);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Create a class that implements Comparable which takes a Number in the constructor. e.g.

public class GenericNumber implements Comparable<GenericNumber> {
    private Number num;
    public GenericNumber(Number num) {
        this.num = num;
    }
    // write compare function that compares num member of two
    // GenericNumber instances
}

Then simply do this:

GenericNumber i = new GenericNumber(new Integer(5));
GenericNumber j = new GenericNumber(new Double(7));
System.out.println(GenericsTest.compare(i,j));
share|improve this answer
    
1) no need for a extraneous GenericNumber, that's what the supertype Number is already for 2) you don't define the meat of the solution basically how to generically compare 3) When you need to compare existing types you create a custom Comparator<T> and not add a new type which is Comparable. Making a type Comparable is more suitable when you already have a type, and it has only one way (or default way) to compare. –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 10:41
    
But supertype Number doesn't implement Comparable, which is why you need to make a wrapper. –  U Mad Dec 7 '12 at 10:48
    
No, you definitely dont need a wrapper. This is precisely the reason why you have the Comparator<T> interface so you can add custom comparators to existing types and it beautifully integrates with the rest of the Java API e.g. Collections, Arrays, etc –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 10:50
    
True, but the OP wanted to make a static function which doesn't use a Comparator. –  U Mad Dec 7 '12 at 10:51
    
Indeed, but the OP wasn't probably aware of all the possibilities. Separate from this you can have the same function accessing statically the NUMBER_COMPARATOR and keep the OP signature, really, no need for a GenericNumber that's what the Number is already for. –  Giovanni Azua Dec 7 '12 at 10:54

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