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Do-While and if-else statements in C/C++ macros

gcc (GCC) 4.7.2
c89

Hello,

I have the following function-like macro and just wondering what is the preferred usage when using across multiple lines. It it better to use curly braces or do..while(0) loop.

Normally I use a do..while(0) for everything. But I have seen some projects where they just use the curly braces, and I am not sure which one would be better.

do..while

#define DSO_ERROR(msg, res_handle_module, mem_pool, size)   do {        \
        char *dso_error = apr_palloc((apr_pool_t*)mem_pool, size);      \
        apr_dso_error((apr_dso_handle_t*)res_handle_module, (char*)dso_error, (apr_size_t)size); \
        LOG_ERR("%s dso error %s", (char*)msg, dso_error);              \
        goto dso_failure;                                               \
    } while(0); 

curly braces

#define DSO_ERROR(msg, res_handle_module, mem_pool, size) {             \
        char *dso_error = apr_palloc((apr_pool_t*)mem_pool, size);      \
        apr_dso_error((apr_dso_handle_t*)res_handle_module, (char*)dso_error, (apr_size_t)size); \
        LOG_ERR("%s dso error %s", (char*)msg, dso_error);              \
        goto dso_failure;                                               \
    }

The only difference is that a semi-colon will be preset on the do..while loop and not on the curly braces.

Many thanks for any suggestions,

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1  
My goodness, this is ugly code. (no offense intended, I'm just very surprised). –  rubenvb Dec 7 '12 at 9:19
2  
Adding the semicolon to the end of the do { ... } while (0) defeats the purpose of using do { ... } while (0) in the first place. The disadvantage of the braces-only version is that you cannot write if (something) DSO_ERROR(...); else { ... } because the semicolon is a null statement after the if and the else is a syntax error. With the corrected version of do { ... } while (0), the if / else notation works as you'd expect if the macro were actually a function. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 8 '12 at 22:18
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marked as duplicate by Michael Burr, Jonathan Leffler, dreamcrash, Explosion Pills, DocMax Dec 9 '12 at 3:31

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The curly brace version will break usage like this:

if( foo )
  DSO_ERROR("Foo occured!", my_module, the_pool, 4711);
else
  printf("All is well, there is no foo\n");

which is the very reason for the do ... while(0) construct. So that seems worth avoiding.

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1  
As written by OP, the do...while(0) version will also break because it has an extra semicolon at the end. The right way to write the do...while(0) is without the semicolon. –  Paolo Bonzini Dec 7 '12 at 11:16
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Usually you do not have the semicolon on the do { ... } while (0) in the macro.

The reason you have do { ... } while (0) for the macro, is that then you can use the macro in the source and add a semicolon without there being an extra empty statement. This is mostly for historical reasons I guess, as having empty statements (i.e. just semicolons without any statements) doesn't do anything in many cases.

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5  
"...doesn't do anything" except dangling else-problem –  Peter Miehle Dec 7 '12 at 9:19
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you will have a problem with this code:

if (one) 
  DSO_ERROR("one", ...);
else
  DSO_ERROR("two", ...);

so if you use the do-while-Macro WITHOUT the semicolon, you would be fine.

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