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I have multiple tables containing historical data, so there is not a 1 to 1 relation between id.

I have to join on id and the time stamp indicating when the data has been active, TO_TIMESTMP can be null if the data is still active or if it has never been set for old data.

My main table after some grouping outputs something like this:

TABLE_A
AID   USER_ID   AMOUNT  FROM_TIMESTMP        TO_TIMESTMP         
1     1         2       11/21/2012 00:00:00  12/04/2012 11:59:00  
1     2         3       11/24/2012 12:00:00  null                 
2     1         2       11/21/2012 01:00:00  null                 

then i have another table that i use to link further

TABLE_B
AID   CID   FROM_TIMESTMP        TO_TIMESTMP          HIST_ID
1     3     11/01/2012 00:00:00  null                 1
1     3     11/21/2012 00:00:00  12/04/2012 11:59:00  2
1     3     11/24/2012 12:00:00  null                 3
2     4     11/21/2012 00:59:59  null                 4

and my 3rd table looks something like this:

TABLE_C
CID   VALUE   FROM_TIMESTMP        TO_TIMESTMP          HIST_ID
3     A       11/01/2012 00:00:00  null                 1
3     B       11/21/2012 00:00:00  11/24/2012 11:59:00  2
3     C       11/24/2012 12:00:00  null                 3
4     D       11/21/2012 01:00:01  null                 4

My expected output if I want to combine table A with Value of from Table C through Table B is:

AID   USER_ID  AMOUNT  FROM_TIMESTMP        TO_TIMESTMP          VALUE
1     1        2       11/21/2012 00:00:00  12/04/2012 11:59:00  B
1     2        3       11/24/2012 12:00:00  null                 C
2     1        2       11/21/2012 01:00:00  null                 D

There is indexes on everything except AMOUNT in Table A and VALUE in Table C and I use the following SQL to pull out the data.

SELECT a.AID, a.USER_ID, a.AMOUNT, a.FROM_TIMESTMP, a.TO_TIMESTMP, c.VALUE from 
(SELECT AID, USER_ID, SUM(AMOUNT), FROM_TIMESTMP, TO_TIMESTMP from TABLE_A GROUP BY AID, USER_ID, FROM_TIMESTMP, TO_TIMESTMP) a
inner join TABLE_B b on b.HIST_ID in (select max(HIST_ID) from TABLE_B
where AID = a.AID and FROM_TIMESTMP <= a.FROM_TIMESTMP+1/2880 and (TO_TIMESTMP>= a.FROM_TIMESTMP or TO_TIMESTMP is null))
inner join TABLE_C c on c.HIST_ID in (select max(HIST_ID) from TABLE_C
where CID = b.CID and FROM_TIMESTMP <= a.FROM_TIMESTMP+1/2880 and (TO_TIMESTMP>= a.FROM_TIMESTMP or TO_TIMESTMP is null));

Due to some inconsistencies on when data is saved I have added a 30 sec grace period when comparing starting time stamps in case they where created around the same time, is there a way to improve the way I do this?

I select the one with MAX(HIST_ID) so cases like AID=1 and USER_ID=2 in TABLE_A only get the newest row that matches id/timestamp from other tables.

In my real data I Inner join 4 tables like this(instead of just 2) and it works good on my local test data (pulling just over 42000 lines in 11 sec when asking for all data).

But when I try and run it on test environment where the data amount is closer to production it runs to slow even when I limit the amount of lines I query in the first table to about 6000 lines by setting FROM_TIMESTMP has to be between 2 dates.

Is there a way to improve the performance of my joining of tables by doing it another way?

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Oracle version is on my local machine "Oracle Database 10g Express Edition Release 10.2.0.1.0 - Product" and on the test environment it is "Oracle Database 11g Release 11.2.0.3.0 - 64bit Production" –  Blem Dec 7 '12 at 11:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

one simple change to avoid the max() repeated sub queries is:

select a.aid,a.user_id,a.amount,a.from_timestmp,a.to_timestmp,a.value
  from (select a.aid,a.user_id,a.amount,a.from_timestmp,a.to_timestmp,c.value, 
       row_number() over (partition by a.aid,a.user_id order by b.hist_id desc, c.hist_id desc) rn
  from (select aid,user_id,sum(amount) amount,from_timestmp,to_timestmp
          from table_a
         group by aid,user_id,from_timestmp,to_timestmp) a
       inner join table_b b
               on b.aid = a.aid
              and b.from_timestmp <= a.from_timestmp + (1 / 2880)
              and ( b.to_timestmp >= a.from_timestmp or b.to_timestmp is null)
       inner join table_c c
               on c.cid = b.cid
              and c.from_timestmp <= a.from_timestmp + (1 / 2880)
              and ( c.to_timestmp >= a.from_timestmp or c.to_timestmp is null)) a
 where rn = 1
  order by a.aid, a.user_id;
share|improve this answer
    
Took a while to change my full SQL call in to this, but it is looking promesing. It runs a bit slower on my local machine, but the cost when asking for Explain Plan on test environment was reduced from 18.446.744.073.709.551.615 to 631.385 (when not limiting the initial call by date) so it is looking promising –  Blem Dec 7 '12 at 13:35

There could be many reasons why your query runs faster on one environment and slower on another. Most probably it's because the optimizer has defined two distinct plans and one runs faster. Probably because the statistics are slightly different.

You can certainly optimize your query to use your indexes but I think your main problem lies with the data and/or data model. And with bad data you'll run into these kind of problems again and again.

It's pretty common to archive data into the same table, it can be useful to represent transient data that needs to be queried historically. However, having archived data should not make you forget essential rules about database design.

In your case it seems you have three related tables: they would be linked in your entity-relationship model. However, somewhere along the designing process, they lost this link so now you can't reliably identify which row is relied to which one.

I suggest the following:

  • If two tables are related in your ER model, add a foreign key. This will ensure that you can always join them if you need to. Foreign keys only add a small cost in DML operations (and only INSERT, DELETE and update to the primary key (?!)). If your data is inserted once and queried many times, the performance impact is negligible.

    In your case if (AID, FROM_TIMESTAMP) is your primary key in TABLE_A, then have the same columns in TABLE_B reference TABLE_A's primary key columns. You may need FROM_TIMESTAMP_A and FROM_TIMESTAMP_C if A and C (which seem unrelated) have distinct updating scheme.

  • If you don't follow this logic, you will have to build your queries differently. If A, B and C are each historically archived yet not fully referenced, you will only be able to answer questions with a single point-in-time reference, questions such as "What was the status of the DB at time TS":

    SELECT *
      FROM A
      JOIN B on A.aid = B.aid
      JOIN C on C.cid = B.cid
     WHERE a.timestamp_from <= :TS
       AND nvl(a.timestamp_to, DATE '9999-12-31') > :TS 
       AND b.timestamp_from <= :TS
       AND nvl(b.timestamp_to, DATE '9999-12-31') > :TS
       AND c.timestamp_from <= :TS
       AND nvl(c.timestamp_to, DATE '9999-12-31') > :TS
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your input, I think the main reason it is slower in one environment compared to the other is the amount of data (if asking for count on all lines I need to get I have 42.000 lines in local data and 19.000.000 in test environment). The tables have foreign keys for there non historical version, but not for the historical data, here they only have primary key for HIST_ID. I am new on the project and don't think it is the best time to come with a request to have foreign keys added to historical data: That is why I'm trying to do the last thing you suggested. –  Blem Dec 7 '12 at 14:57

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