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I'm reading this programming book with the following code

#import "Fraction.h"
int main (int argc, char * argv [])
{
    @autoreleasepool {
        Fraction *f = [[Fraction alloc] init];
        [f noSuchMethod];
        NSLog (@"Execution continues!");
    }
    return 0;
}

Apparently it's supposed to give me the following output:

* Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '-[Fraction noSuchMethod]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x103f00' * Call stack at first throw:'')

Instead I just get an error that says: No visible @interface for 'Fraction' declares the selector 'noSuchMethod'

Is this because I have a newer version of xcode, or am I doing something wrong? It seems pretty straight forward to me.

Edit:

Also... Would this following code work in the newest version of xcode?

int main (int argc, char * argv [])
{
    @autoreleasepool {
        Fraction *f = [[Fraction alloc] init];
        @try {
            [f noSuchMethod];
        }
        @catch (NSException *exception) {
            NSLog(@"Caught %@%@", [exception name], [exception reason]);
        }
        NSLog (@"Execution continues!");
    }
return 0;
}

Edit #2: enter image description here

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possible duplicate of Why is 'no known method for selector x' a hard error under ARC? –  trojanfoe Dec 7 '12 at 12:05

1 Answer 1

Xcode doesn't let you compile if you call a method that certainly doesn't exist.

Else use the performSelector: method.

EDIT

If you directly call the method it won't compile, like in the initial question you have asked.

If you still want to call this method for some reason, because maybe it's private or something else, you can call it via performSelector:.

It will still tell you that the object might not respond to it. You can suppress the warning, as you can see here:

http://www.stackoverflow.com/a/7933931/1320374

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So the book is wrong basically? –  RCYup Dec 7 '12 at 10:35
3  
The book probably refers to an earlier version of Xcode. The version used in the book apparently was not checking for method existence at compile time and therefore threw a runtime exception. The version of Xcode you are now using checks for the existence of a method in question at compile time. –  NSBum Dec 7 '12 at 10:35
    
Thanks for your quick response. Might you be able to give me some more input on my most recent edit to the question? Thanks! –  RCYup Dec 7 '12 at 10:47
    
"Doesn't let you compile?" It just generates a warning but it certainly compiles. –  trojanfoe Dec 7 '12 at 10:49
1  
No, like i wrote in my answer. You can call performSelector: on the Fraction object. Then it will compile and you'll get an exception –  NSAddict Dec 7 '12 at 11:04

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