Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of the examples I'm using on the excellent Tkdocs site, is talking about check boxes and I wanted to modify it to show me which check boxes were checked (in a label).

I defined a function, and then re-did it thinking the second is clearer and therefore more pythonic.

However I'm sure there is a better way still...

If its not obvious onevar twovar and threevar are the checkboxes, outvar is the variable which I'm displaying in my label...

Comments welcome!

    def checkvars(*args):
        if onevar.get():
            if twovar.get():
                if threevar.get():
                    outvar.set('All three are true')
                else:
                    outvar.set('one and two are set to true')
            elif threevar.get():
                outvar.set('one and three are set to true')
            else:
                outvar.set('one is set to true')
        elif twovar.get():
            if threevar.get():
                outvar.set('two and three are set to true')
            else:
                outvar.set('two is set to true')
        elif threevar.get():
            outvar.set('three is set to true')
        else:
            outvar.set('They are all false')

    def checkvars2(*args):
        if onevar.get() and twovar.get() and threevar.get():
            outvar.set('All three are true')
        elif onevar.get() and twovar.get():
            outvar.set('one and two are set to true')
        elif onevar.get() and threevar.get():
            outvar.set('one and three are set to true')
        elif onevar.get():
            outvar.set('one is set to true')
        elif twovar.get() and threevar.get():
            outvar.set('two and three are set to true')
        elif twovar.get():
            outvar.set('two is set to true')
        elif threevar.get():
            outvar.set('three is set to true')
        else:
            outvar.set('They are all false')
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Asad, iiSeymour, Wooble, ekhumoro, Graviton Dec 8 '12 at 9:44

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
This should perhaps been posted on codereview.stackexchange.com instead. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 7 '12 at 10:46
    
I think the term you were looking for is 'pythonic'. A Pythonista is a (not very commonly used) term for someone who codes in Python. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 7 '12 at 10:47
1  
Neither does look really good because of the code duplication. I'd get the checkbox values once and perhaps used that tuple as a dict key to get the message. –  bereal Dec 7 '12 at 11:04
1  
I'm not sure being python makes any difference here -- any language with "if" and "else" will have this problem :P –  Shish Dec 7 '12 at 11:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Small variation on azorius answer for completeness:

def checkvars(*args):
    flags = [x.get() for x in (onevar, twovar, threevar)]

    # Generate a list containing the corresponding string representation of
    # each checked flag value.
    # For example: (True, False, True) gives ('one', 'three')
    num_strings = ('one', 'two', 'three')
    val_strings = [s for f, s in zip(flags, num_strings) if f]

    # Number of checked values correspond to the number of strings.
    checked_count = len(val_strings)
    if checked_count == 0:
        outvar.set('They are all false')
    elif checked_count == len(flags):
        outvar.set('All three are true')
    else:
        verb = 'is' if len(val_strings) == 1 else 'are'
        outvar.set('%s %s set to true' % (' and '.join(val_strings), verb))

Regardless of the language, a function with that many if / elif is rarely acceptable.

share|improve this answer
    
Fairplay, Didn't think it was the best way to do it, not actually seen the zip function before, and the whole val_strings line will need a bit more research... Thanks for the answer! –  RupertO Dec 8 '12 at 10:40

how about something along the lines of: this is not much shorter than what you have, but if you get just a few more 'vars' then this scales a lot better

def checkvars(*args):
    numbers = ['one', 'two', 'three']
    flags = [x.get() for x in (onevar, twovar, threevar)]
    numbers = filter(flags, numbers)
    if len(numbers) == 0:
        outvar.set('They are all false')
    elif len(numbers) == len(numbers):
        outvar.set('All three are true')
    else:
        is_are = {1 : 'is'}.get(l, 'are')
        comma_list = ''.join(('%s, ' % x for x in numbers[:-2]))
        and_list = ' and '.join(numbers[-2:])
        outvar.set(%s%s %s set to true' % (comma_list, and_list, is_are))

changed the last else to ', ' separate when there are 3 or more in numbers

share|improve this answer
1  
It just needs a little test to print is when len(numbers) == 1 :) –  icecrime Dec 7 '12 at 11:14
    
I taught I was so smart because ' and '.join(['one']) prints 'one'... stupid gamma destroying everything! –  jcr Dec 7 '12 at 11:42
    
Thanks for the Answer Azorius, Again, not yet seen the filter function...Appreciate your effort! –  RupertO Dec 8 '12 at 10:41

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.