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Are there any restrictions on what may be contained in a meta-tag content?

I have the following meta-tag defined:

    <meta name="doctype" content="<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN\" \"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd\">"/>

Unfortunately, the w3 validator throws an error that doesn't make sence, because the content really is just a string:

"-" is not a member of a group specified for any attribute

Can anyone explain the issue, we need different information in a client-side jQuery script and until now always used different meta-tags.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are there any restrictions on what may be contained in a meta-tag content?

It depends on the version of HTML.

Most versions are pretty relaxed about it. HTML 5 has pretty strict restrictions (albeit ones which include "and anything on this Wiki page" … which no validator that I'm aware of manages to stay up to date with).

"-" is not a member of a group specified for any attribute

That is because you can't include a raw " character in an attribute value delimited with " characters. You need to represent it as &quot; (or a numerical character reference).

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Oh dear, I escaped them as \" ... which obviously didn't work ^^ –  s.krueger Dec 7 '12 at 10:55

In any HTML specification, a meta tag with the name attribute may contain just anything. (In practice, such tags are mostly such ignore by any software, but formally valid.) HTML5 drafts impose very specific rules, though.

In this case, however, the problem is purely syntactic and does not depend on HTML version. The string content="<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC \" is parsed as attribute specification, and the rest then causes syntax erros. The backslash (reverse solidus) “\” has no special meaning in HTML; it is just yet another character, and it does not work as an escape notation of any kind.

The ultimate problem, however, is the attempt to use a meta tag to specify document type. It simple won’t work, it won’t have any effect, even if you fix the syntax to be formally correct. The way to specify document type is to include a doctype declaration at the very start of the document, e.g.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" 
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

If you don’t do at at the very start, it’s too late to try to specify it later.

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