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I need to summarize data related to references with effective dates.

Let's imagine a salary schema with these tables

employee                                         work
+----+------+                                    +----+--------+------------+
| id | name |                                    | id | emp_id | date       |
+----+------+                                    +----+--------+------------+
|  1 | John |                                    |  1 |      1 | 2012-10-05 |
|  2 | Bob  |                                    |  2 |      1 | 2012-02-10 |
+----+------+                                    |  3 |      2 | 2012-09-03 |
                                                 |  4 |      1 | 2012-12-12 |
salary                                           |  5 |      1 | 2012-04-04 |
+----+--------+--------------+------------+      |  6 |      2 | 2012-06-09 |
| id | emp_id | daily_amount | start_date |      |  7 |      1 | 2012-07-24 |
+----+--------+--------------+------------+      +----+--------+------------+
|  1 |      1 |           10 | 2012-01-01 | 
|  2 |      1 |           15 | 2012-04-16 |
|  3 |      2 |           20 | 2012-05-25 |
+----+--------+--------------+------------+

From 2012-01-01 John was paid 10 by day then from 2012-04-16, his pay is increased to 15.
Bob has been paid 20 since 2012-05-25


Now let's say I need to calculate the salary for both employees in 2012. Here is my naive attempt:

SELECT
  emp.name AS "employee"
, SUM(sal.daily_amount) AS "amount"
FROM employee AS emp
JOIN work AS wrk ON (wrk.emp_id = emp.id)
JOIN salary AS sal ON (
  sal.emp_id = emp.id
  AND wrk.date >= sal.start_date
)
WHERE YEAR(wrk.date) = 2012
GROUP BY emp.id
;

Of course it does not give me what I want because it is not taking the MAX start_date

The question: What is the amount earned by Bob & John in 2012 ?

share|improve this question
1  
Fiddle at sqlfiddle.com/#!2/d39d0 –  MvG Dec 7 '12 at 13:38
    
I would assume that this has been asked before, but I can't find a duplicate just now. –  MvG Dec 7 '12 at 13:51
    
Thank you for the fiddle, I didn't know SQLFiddle yet. I saw other posts asking about effective dates but most of the time on only one occurrence. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Dec 7 '12 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tested the following on SQLfiddle:

SELECT employee.name AS "employee",
       SUM(s1.daily_amount) AS "amount"
FROM work
  INNER JOIN salary s1
     ON work.emp_id = s1.emp_id
    AND work.date >= s1.start_date
  LEFT JOIN salary s2
     ON work.emp_id = s2.emp_id
    AND work.date >= s2.start_date
    AND s2.start_date > s1.start_date
  INNER JOIN employee
     ON work.emp_id = employee.id
WHERE s2.emp_id IS NULL
GROUP BY work.emp_id

The idea is to use the combination of s1 and s2 to look for the last date: s1 is any salary definition prior to the day of work, while s2 is NULL only if there is no later salary definition which would apply as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems quite smart. Thank you –  Pierre de LESPINAY Dec 7 '12 at 14:16
    
@PierredeLESPINAY, for a moment there was a different solution by edze which used a subquery to add an end date to salary. Might provide better performance as the self-join of salary is computed only once and not for every row from work. Unfortunately he deleted his answer. –  MvG Dec 7 '12 at 14:18
    
I saw his answer. So you are saying performance will be better with selfjoin than subquery right ? –  Pierre de LESPINAY Dec 7 '12 at 14:20
    
@PierredeLESPINAY, we both do self joins, as we both use salary twice. But he does so in a subquery, without involving work, so his approach might be faster. In the end, it depends on how MySQL optimizes things, so your best bet is to benchmak things once performance becomes an issue. –  MvG Dec 7 '12 at 14:23

Well, you have a salary table with a start date but you need a end date too. You can do this with a derived table:

  SELECT
    s_1.emp_id,
    s_1.daily_amount,
    s_1.start_date AS start,
    DATE_ADD(MIN(s_2.start_date), INTERVAL -1 DAY) AS end
  FROM
    salary s_1
    LEFT JOIN salary s_2
      ON s_1.emp_id = s_2.emp_id AND s_1.start_date < s_2.start_date
  GROUP BY s_1.emp_id, s_1.start_date

At the end it would look like:

SELECT
  employee.name,
  SUM(s.daily_amount) AS amount
FROM
  employee
  JOIN work
    ON employee.id = work.emp_id
  JOIN
    (
      SELECT
        s_1.emp_id,
        s_1.daily_amount,
        s_1.start_date AS start,
        DATE_ADD(MIN(s_2.start_date), INTERVAL -1 DAY) AS end
      FROM
        salary s_1
        LEFT JOIN salary s_2
          ON s_1.emp_id = s_2.emp_id AND s_1.start_date < s_2.start_date
      GROUP BY s_1.emp_id, s_1.start_date
    ) AS s
    ON employee.id = s.emp_id
    AND
    work.date >= s.start
    AND
    (work.date <= s.end OR s.end IS NULL)
GROUP BY employee.id

EDIT Without DATE_ADD()

SELECT
  employee.name,
  SUM(s.daily_amount) AS amount
FROM
  employee
  JOIN work
    ON employee.id = work.emp_id
  JOIN
    (
      SELECT
        s_1.emp_id,
        s_1.daily_amount,
        s_1.start_date AS start,
        MIN(s_2.start_date) AS end
      FROM
        salary s_1
        LEFT JOIN salary s_2
          ON s_1.emp_id = s_2.emp_id AND s_1.start_date < s_2.start_date
      GROUP BY s_1.emp_id, s_1.start_date
    ) AS s
    ON employee.id = s.emp_id
    AND
    work.date >= s.start
    AND
    (work.date < s.end OR s.end IS NULL)
GROUP BY employee.id
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this solution. I'm going to use @MvG's one for now because it's simpler, but I'll try yours if performance is concerned. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Dec 7 '12 at 14:43
    
Tested at sqlfiddle.com/#!2/d39d0/9. I guess this subquery approach might have better performance than my own answer. Any particular reason why you do the date arithmetic instead of simply work.date < s.end? As you can't use BETWEEN … AND … here, I'd consider that the easier solution. –  MvG Dec 7 '12 at 14:49

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