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I have an valgrind report of Use of uninitialised value of size 8 in the library call CryptoPP::HuffmanEncoder::GenerateCodeLengths on Ubuntu 12.10 libcrypto++9_5.6.1-6_amd64.deb.

I need a sanity check: is there something wrong with the application code? (This is a real possibility as I have just started using crypto++.) Or should I just put the valgrind warning suppression into the ignore filter?

Despite the error, the code looks like it's working.

make: `test3' is up to date.
==5420== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==5420== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==5420== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==5420== Command: ./test3
==5420== 
Plain text = 13312 bytes
==5420== Use of uninitialised value of size 8
==5420==    at 0x520D9A9: CryptoPP::HuffmanEncoder::GenerateCodeLengths(unsigned int*, unsigned int, unsigned int const*, unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520E0A5: CryptoPP::Deflator::EncodeBlock(bool, unsigned int) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520EA2E: CryptoPP::Deflator::EndBlock(bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520F221: CryptoPP::Deflator::Put2(unsigned char const*, unsigned long, int, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F16DB: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::ChannelPut2(std::string const&, unsigned char const*, unsigned long, int, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F1F76: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::TransferMessagesTo2(CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation&, unsigned int&, std::string const&, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F2185: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::TransferAllTo2(CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation&, std::string const&, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x4106A4: CryptoPP::StringSource::StringSource(std::string const&, bool, CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation*) (filters.h:767)
==5420==    by 0x40C7D5: main (test3.cpp:75)
==5420== 
==5420== Use of uninitialised value of size 8
==5420==    at 0x520D9A9: CryptoPP::HuffmanEncoder::GenerateCodeLengths(unsigned int*, unsigned int, unsigned int const*, unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520E0A5: CryptoPP::Deflator::EncodeBlock(bool, unsigned int) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520EA4F: CryptoPP::Deflator::EndBlock(bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x520F221: CryptoPP::Deflator::Put2(unsigned char const*, unsigned long, int, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F16DB: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::ChannelPut2(std::string const&, unsigned char const*, unsigned long, int, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F1F76: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::TransferMessagesTo2(CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation&, unsigned int&, std::string const&, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x50F2185: CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation::TransferAllTo2(CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation&, std::string const&, bool) (in /usr/lib/libcrypto++.so.9.0.0)
==5420==    by 0x4106A4: CryptoPP::StringSource::StringSource(std::string const&, bool, CryptoPP::BufferedTransformation*) (filters.h:767)
==5420==    by 0x40C7D5: main (test3.cpp:75)
==5420== 
Encrypted text = 110 bytes : JFuk7LvDTujLm3D8SdFZCwSXMQsslb0+AUf8sp53Z+oRDIp9aQY1azUF2PZZje/SV1q+IPz5
jGWYkJXlZv2ttADPUdMbg7ib+B4LGlb+7/k=
KEY[16]: ABD86728BB78D5722D07F247D8279CD9
IV [8]: BEBD442990B11C58
==5420== 
==5420== HEAP SUMMARY:
==5420==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==5420==   total heap usage: 118 allocs, 118 frees, 313,921 bytes allocated
==5420== 
==5420== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==5420== 
==5420== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==5420== Use --track-origins=yes to see where uninitialised values come from
==5420== ERROR SUMMARY: 2 errors from 2 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

Compile

g++ -std=c++11 -g3 -O2 -Wall -Wextra -Wno-unused -o test3 test3.cpp -lrt -lcryptopp

test3.cpp Code

#include <cryptopp/blowfish.h>
#include <cryptopp/base64.h>
#include <cryptopp/files.h>
#include <cryptopp/filters.h>
#include <cryptopp/modes.h>
#include <cryptopp/gzip.h>
#include <cryptopp/osrng.h>
#include <cryptopp/hex.h>

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <exception>

int main () 
{
    std::string plainText;
    timespec ts1, ts2;

    plainText = "Hello, world!";
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
        plainText = plainText + plainText;

    byte   iv [ CryptoPP::Blowfish::BLOCKSIZE         ];
    byte   key[ CryptoPP::Blowfish::DEFAULT_KEYLENGTH ]; 

    const bool generate_fast = true;
    CryptoPP::AutoSeededRandomPool rng( !generate_fast ); 
    rng.GenerateBlock( iv,  sizeof( iv  ));
    rng.GenerateBlock( key, sizeof( key ));

    std::cout << "Plain text = " << plainText.size() << " bytes\n";

    std::string cipher, decipher;
    CryptoPP::StringSink*    sink       = new CryptoPP::StringSink( cipher  );
    CryptoPP::Base64Encoder* base64_enc = new CryptoPP::Base64Encoder( sink );
    CryptoPP::CBC_Mode<CryptoPP::Blowfish>::Encryption 
        twofish( key, CryptoPP::Blowfish::DEFAULT_KEYLENGTH, iv );
    CryptoPP::StreamTransformationFilter* 
        enc = new CryptoPP::StreamTransformationFilter( twofish, base64_enc );
    CryptoPP::Gzip *zip = new CryptoPP::Gzip( enc );
    CryptoPP::StringSource source( plainText, true, zip );
    std::cout << "Encrypted text = " << cipher.size() << " bytes : " << cipher;
}
share|improve this question
2  
You could run valgrind with the additional parameter --track-origins=yes to get more information about the source of the uninitialized value. –  sth Dec 7 '12 at 11:47
    
+1 @sth good suggestion, but in this case, it looks like there is no additional information (maybe because the library was not built with -g) –  kfmfe04 Dec 7 '12 at 11:52
    
The uninitialized value might be there for a reason. Check this blogs.fsfe.org/tonnerre/archives/24 –  André Dec 7 '12 at 11:56
1  
Note: Valgrind only report uninitialized values in IO operations. If you can add more IO (more logging), then you will get reports sooner (and thus closer to the source of the issue). –  Matthieu M. Dec 7 '12 at 12:27
    
I believe that's a valid finding. I found similar under Clang and its analyzer or sanitizers. Unfortunately, I cannot locate the patch I built for it (it was a simple as initializing something to 0). –  jww Oct 2 '13 at 23:54

1 Answer 1

According to this valgrind will report an unitialised value when you use a value that hasn't been initialised (fairly obvious).

As far as your code is concerned, different C++ compilers handle declared but uninitialized values differently, depending on flags passed. This can be to set them to zero, but it should not be assumed.

The 8 bytes in the valgrind output could be a pointer, and using uninitialized values for those are especially dangerous.

To be completely certain, you would need access to the source code for this, otherwise you always run the risk of undefined behaviour further down the line.

share|improve this answer
    
-1, this answer is full of dangerous misinformation. "[A] declared but not explicitly initialized variable (a long int, by the look of it in this case) tends to be zero" is wrong and dangerous. "A long int can also be a pointer though" is also wrong and dangerous. The standard provides integer types (std::intptr_t and std::uintptr_t) which are wide enough to hold a pointer. Depending on any other integer type to exhibit this behaviour is dangerous and non-portable. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Aug 14 '14 at 6:03
    
Fair enough on the the comments - I did point out though that he shouldn't assume anything. I'll edit the post. The 8 bytes that he mentions looks like an int or a pointer. Since we don't have the code, we can't be certain. –  roelofs Aug 14 '14 at 6:05
    
@RobertAllanHenniganLeahy - updated the post - can you confirm that I'm not obviously misinforming anymore? –  roelofs Aug 14 '14 at 6:14
    
You can't talk about what happens when you don't initialize a variable and still be talking about C++. The standard is explicit that programs that access uninitialized variables have undefined behaviour, i.e. trying to reason about what they do is impossible, their behaviour is by not constrained by reason. If you want to talk about what actually happens in practice when you do this, then the value is still unlikely to be zero, unless you're running the program under a debugger and have explicitly requested this, or are using compiler flags which cause non conforming behaviour. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Aug 14 '14 at 6:35
    
You'd be best of just removing remarks about what actually happens when such reads are performed, and point out that they invoke undefined behaviour. Anything more than that it just likely to mislead. The compiler can literally do whatever it likes. –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Aug 14 '14 at 6:37

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