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How can I get the coordinates of a location on the grid with the number of one box?

    1  2  3  4  5  6  
------------------------------
1|  1  2  3  4  5  6  
2|  7  8  9 10 11 12 
3| 13 14 15 16 17 18
4| 19 20 21 22 23 24
5| 25 26 27 28 29 30
6| 31 32 33 34 35 36

i.e: if I have the number 15, the coordinates are x=3;y=3

I tried developing a function, but it's not working, does someone have an idea?

Thanks you for your help

share|improve this question
    
you can use 2d array ? Let's see your code – Timur Aykut YILDIRIM Dec 7 '12 at 12:40
    
@Kay thanks, it's resolve my problem :) – Zoners Dec 7 '12 at 12:42
    
Zoners, usually it helps to also add what you have tried already (the function you mentioned) that way we see your attempt so far and if it is "close" you can see that you were on the right track... – curtisk Dec 7 '12 at 12:43
    
@Zoners You are welcome :-) So please mark it as answered. – Kay Dec 7 '12 at 13:03
1  
@Zoners: y=0? I thought x and y start with 1. However, my query returns X:6 Y:1 for 6. – Tim Schmelter Dec 7 '12 at 14:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATE (Formula was wrong):

y = (myNumber - 1) / 6 + 1;
x = (myNumber - 1) % 6 + 1;

UPDATE (Explanation):

Every row contains 6 elements. We define x as remainder when dividing by 6:

x ~ myNumber % 6

and add +1 as the definition range is [1;6].

x ~ myNumber % 6 + 1

But the last element in the row is divisible by 6 without remainder. To consider this we subtract 1 from myNumber before applying the modulo operator:

x = (myNumber - 1) % 6 + 1

e.g. myNumber = 1 => x = 1; myNumber = 6 => x = 6; myNumber = 7 => x = 1; myNumber = 12 => x = 6;

The number of rows is called y and is proportional to the integer division by 6:

y ~ myNumber / 6

But again we we have to consider that we are not starting at 0 but at 1:

y ~ myNumber / 6 + 1

And again there is the 'left shift' as the last element of each row can be divided by 6 without remainder. So we subtract 1 from myNumber before dividing to reflect this:

y = (myNumber - 1) / 6 + 1

share|improve this answer
    
nice, simple and fast :-) – Gustav Klimt Dec 7 '12 at 12:59
1  
But has no explanation. Bad answer. (To clarify: This is the right answer, just not a good one) – Steffan Donal Dec 7 '12 at 13:05
    
@Ruirize +1 for demanding some explanation. But to clarify: The first version wasn't the right answer as it had a bug ;-) – Kay Dec 7 '12 at 14:16
    
@Kay thanks for you explain, it's resolv my problem :) very good explanation – Zoners Dec 7 '12 at 14:20
1  
+0.5 for answer speed, +0.5 for correcting the answer and explaining it. Total score: +1 :) – daniloquio Dec 7 '12 at 14:31

You could use a jagged array:

private static readonly int[][] matrix = new int[6][];

// ...

matrix[0] = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
matrix[1] = new int[] { 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 };
matrix[2] = new int[] { 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 };
matrix[3] = new int[] { 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 };
matrix[4] = new int[] { 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 };
matrix[5] = new int[] { 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 };

and Linq to find the x and y values:

int num = 15;
var matches = matrix
    .Select((yArr, index) => new { yArr, yPos = index + 1 })
    .Where(y => y.yArr.Contains(num))
    .Select(y => new
    {
        X = (y.yArr.Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
                   .First(x => x.x == num).i) + 1,
        Y = y.yPos,
    });

if(matches.Any())
{
    var firstMatch = matches.First();
    int x = firstMatch.X;
    int y = firstMatch.Y;
}

DEMO

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