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I have a UIBarButtonItem which is just an image, I wanted to use this image as the background image of a bar item with an empty string title.

But the width didn't work out correct, in order to have the correct dimensions, I made a UIBarButtonItem with a custom view which was a UIButton with the image set.

The problem I have is that in landscape mode this custom view doesn't resize to fit correctly the smaller navigation bar.

I tried making my button autoresize by allowing flexible height, but it's preserving the top and bottom margins of the portrait and now my button is very squashed.

The reason I originally wanted to use a bar item with empty title was to use the appearance protocol to set the background image for bar metrics default and landscape to bypass this problem.

How can I make my UIBarButtonItem support portrait and landscape sizes with a custom view?

I have a dedicated landscape image so that it's just smaller, not distorted which I want to use.

Portrait:

enter image description here

Landscape:

enter image description here

Landscape with autoresizing, note the margins from portrait are causing an exaggerated squashing of the bar button.

enter image description here

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So what's the end goal here? Do you just want it to maintain its aspect ratio? This is basically the behavior I'd expect from autoresizing masks. –  Max Dec 7 '12 at 14:22
    
Goal: provide a different image for landscape. OR resize with aspect ratio this custom view –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 14:30
    
Do you have any news on this issue ? I have the same problem. –  nobre Sep 24 '13 at 20:14
    
Still not. I used autoresizing in the end and got the squashed result. Better then overlapping IMO. Still weird issue. –  Daniel Sep 25 '13 at 9:02

3 Answers 3

Is the image you're using resizable? Did you create it with - (UIImage *)resizableImageWithCapInsets:(UIEdgeInsets)capInsets?

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Not really... it's not a big deal for it to be squashed from the 30 pixel height of portrait bar item to the 25 pixels of landscape though. But there doesn't seem to be a way to specify or two views for each state or control resizing at all –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 14:04
    
Can you post a screenshot of what it looks like now? –  Max Dec 7 '12 at 14:07
    
I updated with a couple of screenshots –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 14:20

If you just want it to maintain it's aspect ratio, and the custom view you've used is a UIImageView (which I assume it is), you can set the contentMode property of the image view to make it scale while maintaining aspect ratio. You're probably gonna want to use UIViewContentModeScaleAspectFit.

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No it's a UIButton with an image, preserve aspect ratio would be good –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 14:31
    
UIButton has a contentMode property as well (any UIView subclass will). –  Max Dec 7 '12 at 14:32
    
Right, but that's not going to fix the problem however. The issue is that the height of the item is 30 pixels in portrait and 2 in landscape. And I can't find a way to make my button custom view have the 25 pixels. Either it remains it's original size or, if I add some autoresizing, it preserves the top and bottom margins from the portrait mode. Thus, the bar button eight isn't 25 pixels in landscape it's more like 20 pixels. This is why I'm saying it's an exaggerated squash caused by the margins –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 14:44

The best answer is to provide two images one for portrait mode and the other is for the landscape mode and your code will be like

UIBarButtonItem *barBtnLeft= [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] initWithImage:[UIImage imageNamed:@"yourImg.png"] landscapeImagePhone:[UIImage imageNamed:@"yourImg_Landscape.png"]style:UIBarButtonItemStyleBordered target:self action:@selector(yourSelector:)];

I know this post is old, but it luck the right answer, I hope newcomer, like me, will get the help with this solution.

I should mention here that landscape image should be smaller by 0.75f scale.

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