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My Code:

I tried the following code

<SCRIPT type="text/javascript"> 

var num = "10";
var expRegex = /^\d+$/;

if(expRegex.test(num)) 
{
   alert('Integer');
}
else
{
   alert('Not an Integer');
}

</SCRIPT>

I am getting the result as Integer. Actually I declared the num varibale with double quotes. Obviously it is considered as a string. Actually I need to get the result as Not an Integer. How to change the RegEx so that I can get the expected result.

In this case, it should give the result as Not an Integer. But I am getting as Integer.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
if(typeof num === "number" &&
   Math.floor(num) === num)
    alert('Integer');
else
    alert('Not an Integer');

Regular expressions are there to work on strings. So if you tried it with something else than a string the string would either be converted or you would get an error. And yours returns true, because obviously the string only contains digit characters (and that is what you are checking for).

Use the typeof operator instead. But JavaScript doesn't have dedicated types for int and float. So you have to do the integer check yourself. If floor doesn't change the value, then you have an integer.

There is one more caveat. Infinity is a number and calling Math.floor() on it will result in Infinity again, so you get a false positive there. You can change that like this:

if(typeof num === "number" &&
   isFinite(num) &&
   Math.floor(num) === num)
    ...

Seeing your regex you might want to accept only positive integers:

if(typeof num === "number" &&
   isFinite(num) &&
   Math.floor(Math.abs(num)) === num)
    ...
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1  
nitpick: False positive for Infinity and -Infinity –  Esailija Dec 7 '12 at 14:40
    
@Esailija just realised that a second ago :D ... I'll edit that in –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 14:42
    
Consider using isFinite(num) instead of "abs" and comparison to Infinity. –  maerics Dec 7 '12 at 18:01
    
@maerics oh, nice one, didn't know that! –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 18:03

RegExp is for strings. You can check for typeof num == 'number' but you will need to perform multiple checks for floats etc. You can also use a small bitwise operator to check for integers:

function isInt(num) {
    num = Math.abs(num); // if you want to allow negative (thx buettner)
    return num >>> 0 == num;
}

isInt(10.1) // false
isInt("10") // false
isInt(10)   // true
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work on negative integers. (Although that might be desired, seeing the regex) –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 14:47
    
@m.buettner true, adding a Math.abs would solve it. –  David Dec 7 '12 at 14:51

I think it's easier to use isNaN().

if(!isNaN(num))
{
    alert('Integer !');
}
else
{
    alert('Not an Integer !');
}

Léon

share|improve this answer
    
Will return Integer ! for 10.1. –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 14:39

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