Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need help to understand this matter, what's the difference between the 2 queries below, all i know that they doesn't return the same result.

SELECT a.col1, b.c1
  FROM A a
  LEFT JOIN B b
    ON a.col1 = b.c1
 WHERE b.status = 'Y'

and

SELECT a.col1, b.c1
  FROM A a, B b
 WHERE a.col1 *= b.c1
   AND b.status = 'Y'
share|improve this question
    
Do you have a query that uses *= in production? If not, don't worry about this old syntax and go on with the ISO/ANSI Standard-92 JOIN syntax for joins. –  ypercube Dec 7 '12 at 14:38
    
AFAIR the 2 queries are exactly equivalent: new (1992 ?) notation against old (pre-1992) notation. Use the new notation ONLY. –  Germann Arlington Dec 7 '12 at 14:41
add comment

4 Answers 4

I know Sybase and SQL Server are closely related. The *= has been removed from SQl Server but even as far back as SQL Server 2000, it was not working correctly, somtimes interpreting as a left jon and sometimes as cross join. Since Sybase and SQL server came from teh same base product, I woudl suspect this is also your problem with it and why the results are differnt. Do not use the implict join for an outer join as it will not reliably give the correct answer.

Here is a direct quote from Books Online for SQL Server 2000 that discusses this issue:

In earlier versions of Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000, left and right outer join conditions were specified in the WHERE clause using the *= and =* operators. In some cases, this syntax results in an ambiguous query that can be interpreted in more than one way. SQL-92 compliant outer joins are specified in the FROM clause and do not result in this ambiguity.

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sorry to be a little bit late, but i found the solution, in the old syntax *=, the condition b.Status = 'Y' will be in the left join on close, so to have to same result in the first query i just moved the b.Status = 'Y' to the on close.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The first query:

SELECT
       a.col1, b.c1 
FROM 
       a LEFT JOIN b ON a.col1 = b.c1 
WHERE
       b.status = 'Y' ;

is equivalent to an inner join because the b.status column (from the right side of a left outer join) is used in the WHERE part:

SELECT
       a.col1, b.c1 
FROM 
       a INNER JOIN b ON a.col1 = b.c1 
WHERE
       b.status = 'Y' ;

The 2nd query is (probably) executed as:

SELECT
       a.col1, b.c1 
FROM 
       a LEFT JOIN b ON a.col1 = b.c1 
                    AND b.status = 'Y' ;

which may give different results as it is a (logically) different query.

That's one of the reasons you should never use this old syntax. It is ambiguous sometimes, e.g. when there are more than one conditions or more than one outer joins.

share|improve this answer
add comment

These queries look the same. You say they don't return the same results. Do you have an example?

Where the old and new join notations do differ is if you moved the where to the join

Select
  a.col1, 
  b.c1
From
  A
    Left Join
  B 
    On a.col1 = b.c1 And b.Status = 'Y';

This is different, and can't be so easily represented in the old notation (at least not in Oracle's, don't have direct experience of Sybase)

Example (albeit Oracle uses (+) instead of *=)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.