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The following runtime error:

Output is too long but this is the main idea:

" > outer-scope error "

" > [File_fla::MainTimeline~[O] Object[A] Object[A] *[A] *[A]] {} ()"

previous line repeated for every abc bytecode: pushscope, subtract, multiply and convert_d etc.

" > VerifyError: Error #1023: Stack overflow occurred."

for this code:

import flash.geom.Point;
function d(p1:Object, p2:Object):Number
{
   var dx:Number = p2.x - p1.x;
   var dy:Number = p2.y - p1.y;
   // problem here as adding this line solves it -> (dx *= 1;)
   dy *= dy;
   dy += dx;
   return dy;
}
var pt1:Point = new Point(0, 0);
var pt2:Point = new Point(1, 0);
d(pt1, pt2);

I'm not interested in solving the error,
but knowing why it happens: an explanation from a knowledgeable user.

Speculation: I'm guessing it could be related to data hazard in pipelining (using dy before it is ready) as adding the commented line above solves it.

EDIT: This image shows the decompiling of swfs for a slight code variant and a debug mode swf (pinpointed by Daniel in the comments)
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/4057/stackoverflowdecompile.jpg

If the source of the problem was located correctly, the question becomes why is the function at consecutive ‘dup’ calls entering an infinite loop causing the stack to overflow?

share|improve this question
    
The script as it is does not seem to have anything unusual so it is probably caused by the way you're executing it. Can you add some more information about that or some more code? –  inhan Dec 7 '12 at 15:19
1  
good find, looks like as long as you put just about anything before dy *= dy; it works. Also dy *= 1 * dy works, so it seems to me that the input is the cause. Another thing I noticed that when you run it in debug mode it doesn't trip up, so all in all, I'd say your speculation is correct –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 16:44
    
@Daniel Out of curiosity -not that I have any disagreement with you- how did you come up with that idea? Does the above snippet output that runtime error to you at all? –  inhan Dec 7 '12 at 17:23
    
yes, that code in the Flash IDE causes that. Interestingly, it doesn't when I compile from FlashDevelop using the flex compiler. –  Daniel Dec 7 '12 at 19:00
    
@Daniel Thanks for checking it, however it does (even when compiling from FD4 with the flex compiler) if you enclose it with a try catch statement (so the error is there definitely). As for its absence in debug mode and 'dy *= 1 * dy', it motivated me to decompile the swfs and I'm just formatting them right to post them here. –  Chadyk Dec 7 '12 at 23:03

1 Answer 1

what exactly are you trying to achieve ? dy *= dy; looks like you're trying to square dy (dy = dy*dy;).

If you're writing a square distance function, this part looks odd: dy += dx;. I'd write it like this:

function d(p1:Point, p2:Point):Number
{
   var dx:Number = p2.x - p1.x;
   var dy:Number = p2.y - p1.y;
   return dx*dx+dy*dy;
}

I haven't tested if it's faster than using Point's distance() method

A bit off topic, bare in mind Object is a bit slow and you shouldn't need to use it in your case. Bellow is a very basic test:

import flash.utils.*;
import flash.geom.Point;

function d(p1:Point, p2:Point):Number
{
    var dx:Number = p2.x - p1.x;
    var dy:Number = p2.y - p1.y;
    return dx*dx+dy*dy;
}
function d2(p1:Point, p2:Point):Number
{
    var d:Point = p2.subtract(p1);
    return d.x*d.x+d.y*d.y;
}

var p1:Point = new Point();
var p2:Point = new Point(1,0);
var runs:int = 1000000;

var now:int = getTimer();
for(var i:int = 0; i < runs; i++){
   d(p1,p2);    
}
trace(getTimer() - now + " ms");//99ms distanceSquared using typed objects (untyped is~160ms)

now = getTimer();
for(i = 0; i < runs; i++){
   d2(p1,p2);   
}
trace(getTimer() - now + " ms");//689ms distanceSquared using subract and getters - slow

now = getTimer();
for(i = 0; i < runs; i++){
   Point.distance(p1,p2);   
}
trace(getTimer() - now + " ms");//468ms native static method
share|improve this answer
    
Hey George, originally the intent of the code was to verify if using variables consecutively would have any performance benefits: like instead of getting dx then dy and then calling again dx, I would spare a few cycles by getting dx and squaring it then dy...(avoid a set and get in bytecode and keep the variable in register I guess)… Until I stumbled upon the presented problem and wondered about the cause of it which is the core of the question now. –  Chadyk Dec 8 '12 at 2:30
    
Plus I’m sorry about dx and dy naming which may cause confusion as per the topic. As for the Object instead of Point: it was there as the function was being created to take as params Point but also other custom classes’ xs and ys, but thanks for the heads up :). –  Chadyk Dec 8 '12 at 2:30

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