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I am having a hard time understanding how to export a file and then include it elsewhere on node.js.

Suppose I am working on a game and I want to have the variables which define an object, or more than one, for example a var enemy:

var enemy = {
  health: 100,
  strengh: 87
};

and I save it in a file vars.js.

How can one import these variables from anywhere in my project where I need them?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You would need to export them.

So Enemy.js:

var enemy = {
  health: 100,
  strengh: 87
};

exports.health = enemy.health;
exports.strength = enemy.strength;

And in otherjsfile.js:

var Enemy = require('Enemy.js');


//and then you can do 

console.log(Enemy.health); ///etc

Side point:

If the 'enemy' information is changing periodically and you want to get the newest value, you would do:

  Object.defineProperty(exports, "health", {
    get: function() {
      return enemy.health;
    }
  }); //instead of `exports.health = enemy.health;`

  Object.defineProperty(exports, "strengh", {
    get: function() {
      return enemy.strengh;
    }
  }); //instead of `exports.strength = enemy.strength;`
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Your side-point is confusing and misleading. the exported object is shared across modules. Changing the 'health' value on it is reflected in all modules that require it. –  broofa Dec 7 '12 at 15:11
    
@broofa that has not been my experience at all. The values are not maintained. especially if you do it the way I have in the 1st part of my answer. If enemy.health changes, then exports.health does not. There is no references in javascript (that I know of) –  Neal Dec 7 '12 at 15:13
    
That's because 'enemy' is a different object than 'exports'. But if you do 'exports.health = ...' in the main module, that property is updated everywhere. I strongly suggest you do some more reading about how modules work - in fact, implementing a module loader would probably be a very educational exercise for you. –  broofa Dec 7 '12 at 15:15
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you can export from vars.js doing

module.exports = {
  health: 100,
  strengh: 87
};

or

var enemy = {
  health: 100,
  strengh: 87
};

module.exports = enemy;

And import using require:

var enemy = require('./path/to/vars');
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in file.js:

module.exports = {
  health: 100,
  strengh: 87
}

in other files:

var enemy = require('./file'); // (or whatever the relative path to your file is

More info here.

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Where did module.exports come from? isn't it just exports? –  Neal Dec 7 '12 at 14:58
    
module.exports is available to all modules, and allows you to redefine what object is exported by the module .vs. using the default exports module you get. It's often a simpler mechanism for exporting something in-bulk instead of hanging individual properties off `exports. (note, too, that it also allows you to export a function, string or other non-Object property should you choose to do that.) –  broofa Dec 7 '12 at 15:06
    
I have exported functions and objects with just plain export.... I do not see the difference. –  Neal Dec 7 '12 at 15:07
1  
    
@neal - not enough room here to go into more detail. suffice it to say that you'll find some nice uses for it when you start creating sufficiently complex module dependencies. –  broofa Dec 7 '12 at 15:09
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