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I've got a document

{ key : 'key1', value : 'value1', update_time : 100 }

That I'd like to change only with more recent (greater) update times. What I'm doing now is:

def update_key1(new_value, new_time):
    record = find_one( { key : 'key1' } )
    if not record or record['update_time'] < new_time:
        update( { key : 'key1', value : new_value, update_time : new_time }, upsert=True)

Obviously this is an extra roundtrip to the db, but more importantly there's no lock on the document, and concurrent calls could result in a lower new_time's value remaining in the db. Is there a way to perform an upsert only if a condition is true?

EDIT: Just to clarify, the intention is not to create multiple documents for each key and then sort on lookup. Though that would solve my problem, these values change a lot and would waste a lot of space.

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I have had the similar question! stackoverflow.com/questions/10059739/… –  JohnS Feb 14 '13 at 9:17
    
Have you been able to solve this issue? I am having exactly similar use case and I am not able to solve it even after using $setOnInsert. –  ameykpatil Jul 8 '13 at 10:34
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4 Answers

You can do a conditional update:

db.MyObjects.update( { key : "key1", value: { $lt : aValue }},
                    { $set : { value : aValue }});
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But I'd like to insert the object if it doesn't exist already. And if I change this to an upsert, it will add a new document if it's not the newest, right? –  Parker Dec 11 '12 at 18:40
    
Yes, it should work that way if you're query is correct. Make sure your _id column is provided or it will create a new document. –  WiredPrairie Dec 11 '12 at 21:41
    
@WiredPrairie The reason to do an upsert is because you don't know if a matching document exists; how could you know its _id to provide? –  rakslice Oct 6 '13 at 21:36
    
You don't need to use an ObjectId for an _id. –  WiredPrairie Oct 7 '13 at 1:02
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If WPCoder's response with and upsert=True isn't what you're looking for, than you may need $setOnInsert, which isn't implemented yet: https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-340. It should be implemented for 2.4.0.

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Seems that you're looking for findAndModify. Sorry, I'm not familiar with python so I won't be able to give you a code snippet but the command should be pretty straight forward.

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I don't think findAndModify will solve this. The issue arises from identifying whether to perform a modification on a record. I don't see a way to do that from the docs. –  Parker Dec 7 '12 at 16:12
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Short of being able to do the whole thing atomically, there are two kinds of existing conditions where you want to make a change, and you can deal with each of them atomically:

  • no record for the key exists
  • a record for the key exists and its update_time is older than new_time

Update an existing record for key:

def update_if_stale(key, new_value, new_time):
    collection.update({'key': key,
                       'update_time': {'$lt': new_time}
                       },
                      {'$set': {'value': new_value,
                                'update_time': new_time
                                }
                       }
                      )

Insert if a record for key didn't exist before:

def insert_if_missing(key, new_value, new_time):
    collection.update({'key': key},
                      {'$setOnInsert': {'value': new_value,
                                        'update_time': new_time
                                        }
                       },
                      upsert=True
                      )

($setOnInsert was added in MongoDB 2.4)

You might be able to put those together to get what you need, e.g.:

def update_key(key, new_value, new_time):
    insert_if_missing(key, new_value, new_time)        
    update_if_stale(key, new_value, new_time)

However, depending on what remove/insert time scales might be possible in your system, you might need multiple calls (update/insert/update) or other shenanigans.

Aside: If you want a record missing the update_time field to be treated as a stale record to update, change {'$lt': new_time}} to {'$not': {'$gte': new_time}}

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cheesy test: pastebin.com/K02hWMvi –  rakslice Oct 6 '13 at 23:14
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