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I'm currently doing something like this in java to free resources. Do I need to call close on the BufferedWriter object or is it called in the destructor? With regard to Resource1 and Resource2, I must call release and free respectfully. Is this the correct approach with nested trys? Python has a really nice "with statement" which associates resources with a code scope. Does java have the likes?

Resource1 r1 = new Resource1();
try
{
    ...
    Resource2 r1 = new Resource2();
    try
    {
        ...
        java.io.BufferedWriter f = new java.io.BufferedWriter(new java.io.FileWriter(new java.io.File("f")));
        try
        {
           ...
        }
        finally
        {
           f.close(); 
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        r2.release(); 
    }
}
finally
{
    r1.free(); 
}

UPDATE: I'm using Java 1.6

share|improve this question
1  
Java 7 has try with resource feature, from your question not clear which java version you are using docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… – Nambari Dec 7 '12 at 15:37
    
possible duplicate of How to Correctly Close Resources – djechlin Dec 7 '12 at 15:38
    
Please Google first. – djechlin Dec 7 '12 at 15:38
    
@djechlin I have googled... – Baz Dec 7 '12 at 15:48
    
@Baz I copied and pasted the title of your question into Google and the first hit was the link I voted to close as duplicate. – djechlin Dec 7 '12 at 15:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you have with respect to BufferedWriter is correct.

However, you may want to swallow any exceptions that occur during close. This is annoying but necessary. Often the following pattern is used:

BufferedWriter f = null;
try {
  f = new BufferedWriter(...);
  ...
}
finally {
  try {
    if(f != null) {
      f.close();
    }
  }
  catch(IOException e) {
    // Nothing can be done, except maybe log it.
  }
}

IOUtils.finallyClose() can be used to remove the need for the catch on close.

Java doesn't quite have the concept of destructors, but it does have finalize() that get's call when an object is garbage collected. You should never depend on finialize() to close or otherwise cleanup an object.

Btw, Java 7 introduced a shorter syntax for closing objects that implement Closeable.

try (BufferedWriter f = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(new File("f"))) {
  ...
}

EDIT: I expanded on finally..close.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm new to Java but I've never swallowed exceptions before. Must I really do this? Isn't f guaranteed to be an instance after the line java.io.BufferedWriter f = ...? – Baz Dec 7 '12 at 15:51
1  
Yes (unless you're using the new Java 7 syntax). Some have criticized Sun for making close throw a checked exception. I guess it's good to know something went wrong during the close, but in many situations there's nothing you can do about it by that time. In just about every other case, it's a bad idea to swallow exceptions. I highly suggest using Java 7 for this kind of thing, if that's an option for you. – mikeslattery Dec 7 '12 at 16:07

You need to close the file handle and other similar resoures yourself. It is a bad approach to rely on the finalizer to do this.

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finally block is meant to close your resources, i dont understand your answer – PermGenError Dec 7 '12 at 15:40
    
Yes. I though you ask if this is correct. This is correct. – h22 Dec 7 '12 at 15:41
    
i am not the OP , :P, i dont understand what you mean by finalizer in your code ? – PermGenError Dec 7 '12 at 15:43
    
Finalizer is an object method called by JRE when the object is garbage collected. Every object has such, it is normally overridden to free all attached resources. However with more memory available you may get out of handles before the garbage is collected. – h22 Dec 7 '12 at 15:45
    
ahh, you meant finalize() method in object class.. haha, i tought you were refering to finally block in which case yoour answer would be incorrect, anyways, thats a right answer, +1 – PermGenError Dec 7 '12 at 15:48

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