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I've written my own access layer to a game engine. There is a GameLoop which gets called every frame which lets me process my own code. I'm able to do specific things and to check if these things happened. In a very basic way it could look like this:

void cycle()
{
    //set a specific value
    Engine::setText("Hello World");

    //read the value
    std::string text = Engine::getText();
}

I want to test if my Engine-layer is working by writing automated tests. I have some experience in using the Boost Unittest Framework for simple comparison tests like this.

The problem is, that some things I want the engine to do are just processed after the call to cycle(). So calling Engine::getText() directly after Engine::setText(...) would return an empty string. If I would wait until the next call of cycle() the right value would be returned.

I now am wondering how I should write my tests if it is not possible to process them in the same cycle. Are there any best practices? Is it possible to use the "traditional testing" approach given by Boost Unittest Framework in such an environment? Are there perhaps other frameworks aimed at such a specialised case?

I'm using C++ for everything here, but I could imagine that there are answers unrelated to the programming language.

UPDATE: It is not possible to access the Engine outside of cycle()

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Unless the Engine can signal you in a way that it's done processing, I don't really see this working. Very curious to see other people's answers, though. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Dec 7 '12 at 16:05
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2 Answers

In your example above, std::string text = Engine::getText(); is the code you want to remember from one cycle but execute in the next. You can save it for later execution. For example - using C++11 you could use a lambda to wrap the test into a simple function specified inline.

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There are two options with you:

If the library that you have can be used synchronously or using c++11 futures like facility (which can indicate the readyness of the result) then in your test case you can do something as below

void testcycle()
{
    //set a specific value
    Engine::setText("Hello World");
    while (!Engine::isResultReady());
    //read the value
    assert(Engine::getText() == "WHATEVERVALUEYOUEXPECT");
}

If you dont have the above the best you can do have a timeout (this is not a good option though because you may have spurious failures):

void testcycle()
{
    //set a specific value
    Engine::setText("Hello World");
    while (Engine::getText() != "WHATEVERVALUEYOUEXPECT") {
        wait(1 millisec);
        if (total_wait_time > 1 sec) // you can put whatever max time
              assert(0);
    }

}
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First answer is not possible because engine doesn't have isResultReady(), second answer is bad by design : introducing timeouts and sleeps in this kind of tests is a bad thing, because you're forgetting that the time needed to sleep can be different on every machine. Your Core i7 might need only 1 second, but some older Pentium might need 2. In both cases, the testcase should pass, but - if a sleep is used - it will fail in the second case. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Dec 7 '12 at 16:10
1  
The GameEngine processes Engine::setText(..) after calling cycle(), so adding a timeout would be the same as if I would call Engine::getText() directly after, it just takes more time. I'm only able to get the right results after setTextis processed in the GameEngine, which means in the next cycle() –  MOnsDaR Dec 7 '12 at 16:11
    
@DanielKamilKozar - you should read properly my comments.. "(this is not a good option though because you may have spurious failures)" –  RamneekHanda Dec 7 '12 at 16:12
    
Sorry, but going rampant is the first thing I do after seeing sleep in tests of multi-threaded code. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Dec 7 '12 at 16:13
    
@MOnsDaR - If you think, above are the only reasonable alternatives you have. You will have to either change Engine class to support isResultReady or will have to write approximate how long you expect (not nice but i know systems where this has to be done and it does work, in one of case if you see failures then you ignore it).. –  RamneekHanda Dec 7 '12 at 16:15
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