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I have two vectors:

A <- c(1,3,5,6,4,3,2,3,3,3,3,3,4,6,7,7,5,4,4,3) # 7 unique values
B <- c("a","b","c","d","e","f","g")   # 7 different values

I would like to match the values of B to A such that the smallest value in A gets the first value from B and continued on to the largest.

The above example would be:

A:        1 3 5 6 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 6 7 7 5 4 4 3
assigned: a c e f d c b c c c c c d f g g e d d c
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this:

A <- c(1,3,5,6,4,3,2,3,3,3,3,3,4,6,7,7,5,4,4,3)
B <- letters[1:7]

B[match(A, sort(unique(A)))]
#  [1] "a" "c" "e" "f" "d" "c" "b" "c" "c" "c" "c" "c" "d" "f" "g"
# [16] "g" "e" "d" "d" "c"
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1  
why not just B[A]? –  Matthew Plourde Dec 7 '12 at 17:08
1  
@MatthewPlourde -- Just b/c I decided to address the general question rather than just the minimal ~ reproducible example provided ;) –  Josh O'Brien Dec 7 '12 at 17:13
1  
@MatthewPlourde: If A did not contain all the integers between 1:max(A) then using B[A] would fail. (or rather, it would not produce the intended results) –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 7 '12 at 18:25
    
@JoshOBrien, +1 understood. Such are the best answers. :) –  Matthew Plourde Dec 7 '12 at 19:16

Another option that handles the general case that @JoshO'Brien addresses would be

B[as.numeric(factor(A))]
# [1] "a" "c" "e" "f" "d" "c" "b" "c" "c" "c" "c" "c" "d"
# [14] "f" "g" "g" "e" "d" "d" "c"

A2<-ifelse(A > 4, A + 1, A)
# [1] 1 3 6 7 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 7 8 8 6 4 4 3
B[as.numeric(factor(A2))]
# [1] "a" "c" "e" "f" "d" "c" "b" "c" "c" "c" "c" "c" "d"
# [14] "f" "g" "g" "e" "d" "d" "c"

However, following benchmark shows that this method is slower than @JoshOBrien's.

library(microbenchmark)
B <- make.unique(rep(letters, length.out=1000))
A <- sample(seq_along(B), replace=TRUE)
unique_sort_match <- function() B[match(A, sort(unique(A)))]
factor_as.numeric <- function() B[as.numeric(factor(A))]
bm<-microbenchmark(unique_sort_match(), factor_as.numeric(), times=1000L)
plot(bm)

enter image description here

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consider A <- c(1, 3, 5, 7). using as.numeric(factor(A)) gives: [1] 1 2 3 4 –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 7 '12 at 20:24
1  
@RicardoSaporta ... which is just what the OP would want, right? –  Josh O'Brien Dec 7 '12 at 20:40
    
@RicardoSaporta Not sure I see your point. Is that your downvote? –  Matthew Plourde Dec 7 '12 at 21:26
    
@Josh: I believe you are right. My mistake. Sorry Matt –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 7 '12 at 21:34
    
yep, tried to change my downvote to an upvote, but it's waiting on an edit. –  Ricardo Saporta Dec 7 '12 at 21:40

To elaborate on the comments in @Josh's answer:

If A does in fact represent a permutation of the elements of B (ie, where a 1 in A represents the first element of B, a 4 in A represents the 4th element in B, etc), then as @Matthew Plourde points out, you would want to simply use A as your index to B:

B[A]

If A does not represent a permutation of B, then you should use the method suggested by @Josh

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Thanks for explaining that. I was too lazy to do it myself! –  Josh O'Brien Dec 7 '12 at 18:39

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