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Sorry if it a trivial question:

Implementation 1:

class Foo
{
    protected: int bar;

    public: Foo(int bar)
      {
        this->bar =bar;
      }
};

Implementation 2:

class Foo
{
    protected: int bar;

    public: Foo(int bar)
      {
        this.bar =bar;
      }
};

Output from implementation 2:

request for member ‘x’ in ‘this’, which is of pointer type ‘Foo* const’ (maybe you meant to use ‘->’ ?)

so this is a pointer, and this question has syntax error in code

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1  
This is something fundamental - (raw) pointers can be used only with ->, and not with .. –  Kiril Kirov Dec 7 '12 at 16:50
1  
FYI - C++ & C# are 2 different languages. –  user93353 Dec 7 '12 at 16:51
    
I come from Java. Somethings are lost in translation @user93353 the code is tagged C++ && C#. My bad though –  aiao Dec 7 '12 at 16:56
1  
@aiao: I have removed the C++ tag from the linked question, as the code was clearly not C++ –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 7 '12 at 16:59
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The question you are referring to contains code samples written in C#, not C++. Yes, in C++, this is a pointer and must be dereferenced to access any members of the object it points to.

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sorry about that it was tagged with c++, so assumed they wold be the same. Thanx –  aiao Dec 7 '12 at 16:50
    
Actually this is a pointer in C# too, but C# has got a sort of automatic dereference :) –  BlackBear Dec 7 '12 at 16:50
    
@BlackBear Thanks, I don't know any C#. I think my edit doesn't suggest anything about C# now. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 7 '12 at 16:51
    
@aiao A fair mistake. :) –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 7 '12 at 16:52
    
@BlackBear: no, it's not "a sort of automatic dereference". The . operator in Java and C# is simply how you write the C++ -> operator in those languages. Different languages write their operators differently. –  newacct Dec 8 '12 at 2:49
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