Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'd like to create an object with some hidden (using closures) variables, and methods that utilize those hidden variables. I don't however want to recreate those methods for each instantiation. I'd like to have them in memory once. I'm using plain functions to instantiate objects.

Here's some code:

function Mario () {
  var mario = {}; // create the obj
  mario.name = "Mario"; // create a property on it
  mario.hp = (function () { // set up a closure
    var currentHp = Mario.baseHp * 100; // create a "hidden" variable
    return function (value) { // return the hp function that utilizes the hidden currentHp variable
      if (!!value) {
        return currentHp = ((currentHp * Mario.baseHp) + value);
      }
      return currentHp * Mario.baseHp;
    };
  }());
  return mario; // send along the newly created object
}
Mario.baseHp = 1;

var mario = Mario();
log(mario);
log(mario.hp());
log(mario.hp(-20));
log(mario.hp());

The problem here is that every time I create another "mario" object, I've created the hp function again in memory. Here's my attempt at a solution so far:

function Mario () {
  var mario = {}; // create the obj
  mario.name = "Mario"; // create a property on it
  mario.hp = (function () { // set up a closure
    var currentHp = Mario.baseHp * 100; // create a "hidden" variable
    return Mario.hp; // reference the hp function below..... but the context is wrong, it needs access to currentHp variable.
  }());
  return mario; // send along the newly created object.
}
Mario.baseHp = 1;
Mario.hp = function (value) { // Create the hp function once in memory
  if (!!value) {
    return currentHp = ((currentHp * Mario.baseHp) + value);
  }
  return currentHp * Mario.baseHp;
};
var mario = Mario();
log(mario);
log(mario.hp());
log(mario.hp(-20));
log(mario.hp());

But obviously the context of Mario.hp is wrong. I'm thinking there might be a way to use call or apply that would resolve this. Any help would rock!

share|improve this question
2  
Why not use prototype ? –  Denys Séguret Dec 7 '12 at 17:21
    
I'm not sure what you're trying to do, but you may find this interesting. –  Pointy Dec 7 '12 at 17:24
    
Wow that's convoluted. Can you come up with a minimalist example demonstrating the question? –  T.J. Crowder Dec 7 '12 at 17:26
    
@Pointy Thanks! I've come across bind before, but it makes much more sense to me now. –  Costa Dec 8 '12 at 18:42

3 Answers 3

The usual solution is to use prototype and new :

function Mario () {
  this.name = "Mario"; // create a property on it
  this.baseHP = 33;
}
Mario.prototype.hp = function () { 
    var currentHP = this.baseHp * 100;
    ...
};

var mario = new Mario();
log(mario);
log(mario.hp());
log(mario.hp(-20));
log(mario.hp());

This creates what is usually called a class Mario. Using new Mario() create instances of this classe, all of them using the same function hp (this in the function refer to the instance).

EDIT

If you want to store the currentHP variable and the hp function to return it, simply do this :

function Mario () {
  this.name = "Mario"; // create a property on it
  this.baseHP = 33;
  this.currentHP = this.baseHp * 100;
}
Mario.prototype.hp = function () { 
    return this.currentHP;
};

var mario = new Mario();
log(mario);
log(mario.hp());
share|improve this answer
1  
If you have currentHP inside a closure in the prototype, it will be the same value for all instances. I don't think that's what OP wants. –  Justin Morgan Dec 7 '12 at 18:20
    
There is no closure in my code. currentHP is dynamically computed each time hp is called using the value of baseHP of the instance. –  Denys Séguret Dec 7 '12 at 18:27
    
Your previous edit had Mario.prototype.hp = (function () { ... as though there were a closed-over function inside it. I was referring to that. –  Justin Morgan Dec 7 '12 at 18:51
    
The opening parenthesis was just a typo : a parenthesis I forgot to remove after copy-paste. –  Denys Séguret Dec 7 '12 at 18:52
1  
OK, I see what you mean. You want the hp function to be an accessor. See edit. –  Denys Séguret Dec 8 '12 at 18:54

I think all this discussion of prototypes is overkill, and not really all that helpful to your situation. You don't really need a prototype here, since all your instances of Mario are going to have their own value for currentHp. Likewise, you don't need to make Mario a true constructor and worry about having to remember the new keyword (although you can if you want).

As far as I can tell, everything you're trying to do can be handled by closures, with the added bonus of keeping your private members (like baseHP and your logic for calculating HP) truly private. Try this:

var Mario = (function () {
    //"private" variable encapsulated by the closure
    var baseHp = 1;

    //"private" method for calculating HP given an instance's current HP
    var getHp = function (currentHp, value) {
        return currentHp * Enemy.baseHp + (value || 0);
    };

    //in OOP terms, baseHp and getHp would be like private static members used by
    //the whole class.

    return function () {
        //another "private" variable, but this one is only for 
        //the current instance.
        var currentHp = baseHp * 100;

        //instance:
        return {
            name: "Mario",
            hp: function (value) {
                return !!value
                    ? currentHp = getHp(currentHp, value)
                    : getHp(currentHp);
            }
        };
    };
})();

I've tested this in the console, and it seems to work fine:

//test
var Enemy = {
    baseHp: 3
};
var log = console.log.bind(console);
var mario = Mario(); //or new Mario(); either one is fine
log(mario);
log(mario.hp());
log(mario.hp(-20));
log(mario.hp());

Try it out on jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jmorgan123/zkw2P/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Justint! This is helpful. Side Note: I was keeping baseHp public so that if I were to change it later, I could affect the hp of all instances of Mario. –  Costa Dec 8 '12 at 19:26
var Mario = (function() {
  var name = "Mario"; 
  var hp = function (value) { 
      var currentHp = baseHp * 100; 
      if (!value) {
          return currentHp = ((currentHp * Enemy.baseHp) + value);
      }
      return currentHp * Enemy.baseHp;
  }
  return {
        name:name,
        hp:hp
  }
})();
console.log(Mario);
console.log(Mario.hp());
console.log(Mario.hp(-20));
console.log(Mario.hp());

I make no claim as to the validity of the rest of what you're doing, since there seem to be a lot of variable shown but not accounted for, but your enclosure seems to be in the wrong place.

share|improve this answer
    
var function (value) { Is this a typo? Looks like that line (and the matching }; below) shouldn't be there. Or perhaps var should be return and the enclosing function should be run immediately. –  Justin Morgan Dec 7 '12 at 17:48
    
@JustinMorgan you're absolutely right. I must have missed that trying to clean up the OP code. –  Randy Hall Dec 7 '12 at 17:51
    
Same challenge as dystory's answer. The hp function resets the value of currentHp everytime hp is called. I need currentHp to persist. I'm essentially trying to implement hp as an accessor. –  Costa Dec 8 '12 at 19:22
    
Okay this is helpful too, there's an interesting bit there about the placement of the closure. –  Costa Dec 8 '12 at 22:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.