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EDIT: None of the code is mine, it was all given to me and I'm just analyzing it from an object allocation methods point of view.

I'm having a really hard time with memory allocation. I promise you I've looked at a hundred examples on here over the last 5 hours. I understand this is probably poorly worded and I apologize in advance.

1.) I don't understand why Version 2 prints class A's f() instead of class B's. The line

A* objA1 = objB;

is declaring a pointer, objA1, that points to an object of type A and it is assigning its address to where objB is pointing, B(2,3). I've read the sentence" if they're heap-dynamic objects, then you can assign b1 to a1". When I call objA1->f(), am I simply saying go to this location, oh you found a B? well cast it into an A and call f().

2.) I would have thought Version 1 sliced objB, because it is saying set this object which has been allocated room for A, equal to B which is larger. But if I put cout << objB.bf; after this assignment, it is still valid. is A objA1 = objB; not statically declaring objA1? And once again, why wouldn't this print B's f()?

3.) What is the difference between the two objA1 assignments? As in what functionality would only work with one of the two. Could you call both "heap-dynamic" if you wanted to give it an outdated classification of sorts?

class A {
  private:
    int a;
  public:
    A(int ia) {a = ia;}
    void f() { 
      cout << "Call to method f defined in class A" << endl;
    }
};
 class B : public A {
  private:
    int b;
  public:
    B(int ia, int ib) : A(ia) {b = ib;}
    void f() { 
      cout << "Call to method f specialized in class B" << endl; 
    }
    void bf() { 
      cout << "Call to class B own method bf" << endl; 
    }
}; 
// C++ driver - Version 1
void main() { 
  A objA = A(1);
  B objB = B(2,3);

  objA.f();
  objB.f();
  objB.bf(); 

  A objA1 = objB;
  objA1.f();
}

 // C++ driver - Version 2
void main() {
  A* objA = new A(1);
  B* objB = new B(2,3);

  objA->f();
  objB->f();
  objB->bf(); 
  A* objA1 = objB;
  objA1->f();
} 
share|improve this question
    
main returns int, not void. –  GManNickG Dec 7 '12 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++ does not use dynamic dispatch by default. This means that calling p->f() when p is declared as X *p will always call X::f(), regardless of the dynamic type of the instance pointed to by p. To enable dynamic dispatch, the function must be declared virtual. This is in contrast against Java/C#, where all member functions are implicitly virtual.

The slicing in "Version 1" indeed occurs, however, objB is in no way affected by being assigned somewhere. It's objA that is affected by slicing (i.e. it ignores the part of objB which is not part of A).

share|improve this answer
    
Can you help me with what the difference is between the two objA1 assignments are? As in what functionality would only work with one of the two. Could you call both "heap-dynamic" if you wanted to give it an outdated classification of sorts? –  caleb.breckon Dec 7 '12 at 18:07
    
@caleb.breckon A objA1 = objB; (where objB is of type B) creates object objA1 of type A on the stack (the variable's value is the object itself). A *objA1 = objB; (where objB is of type B*) copies pointers - after the assignment, both objA1 and objB (which are both pointers) point to the same instance of objB, which was allocated on the heap using new. –  Angew Dec 7 '12 at 18:13

You need to declare your functions that you wish to be called polymorphically (through a pointer to base) as virtual in the base class. When the compiler encounters a call to a virtual function through a pointer (or reference) to an object it looks the function up for the dynamic type of the object, rather than the static type. So simply stick virtual in front of your function definition in A:

virtual void f() { 
  cout << "Call to method f defined in class A" << endl;
}

Your line A objA1 = objB; does indeed slice your B object, only copying the A part of it over to objA1. You will only be able to call A's member functions on objA1. However, objB is still the same object it always was - it's still a B and has all of B's member functions available. You can happily call objB->bf() but not objA->bf() nor objA1->bf().

If in doubt, just look at the type of the object you're calling your function on. If it's an A you can only call A's functions, and likewise with B. If you're accessing through a pointer and calling a virtual function, then the function belonging to the dynamic type of the object is called (rather than the type the pointer says it's pointing to).

share|improve this answer
    
Can you help me with what the difference is between the two objA1 assignments are? As in what functionality would only work with one of the two. Could you call both "heap-dynamic" if you wanted to give it an outdated classification of sorts? –  caleb.breckon Dec 7 '12 at 18:07
    
@caleb.breckon The first is just assigning a B* pointer to an A* - that's totally fine and no object slicing occurs because you're not copying the objects they point to. When you assign an object of type B to an object of type A, however, you are actually copying the value of one object to the other and obviously the value of a B can't fit inside the value of an A so you get object slicing. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 7 '12 at 18:13

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