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I need to write a recursive function to print the prime factoring elements of an integer, ascending.

void printPrimeFactors(int num)
{
int div;

if (isPrime(num) == true)
    cout << num << " ";

else
{
    for (div = 2; div < num; div++)
    {
        if (isPrime(div) == true && num%div == 0)
            printPrimeFactors(num/div);
    }
}

What am I doing wrong? My output, for 20 is:

5 2 5 2 2

My smallest input is a prime number and a smaller input for the recursive function is num div (smallest prime divider of num).

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1  
What do you see that makes you think you do something wrong? –  Benjamin Bannier Dec 7 '12 at 18:04
    
my output, for 20 it's: 5 2 5 2 2 –  Quaker Dec 7 '12 at 18:05
    
Edited that into your question. –  Benjamin Bannier Dec 7 '12 at 18:12
    
You shouldn't be looping and recurring. –  larsmans Dec 7 '12 at 18:13
    
how else can I find the smallest prime number that divides num? –  Quaker Dec 7 '12 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe the following will work:

void printPrimeFactors(int num, int div = 2)
{
        if (num % div == 0) {
                std::cout << div << " ";
                printPrimeFactors(num / div, div);
        } else if (div <= num) {
                printPrimeFactors(num, div + 1);
        }
}

As requested, it is recursive, even though recursion isn't necessary and can be trivially converted into iteration.

The reason your original version doesn't quite work is twofold:

  1. the printing is misplaced, which results in the factors being printed in descending order;
  2. after the recursive call you keep trying further divisors, which results in the duplicate factors appearing on the output.
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There's no need for isPrime(div). If div isn't prime, then some number x where 2 <= x < div would have been called before it. –  Bill Lynch Dec 7 '12 at 18:16
    
As it is a part of my homework for college, I am not allowed to break; a loop while it's working. –  Quaker Dec 7 '12 at 18:20
    
@sharth It short circuits the check on num % div == 0, though. It's seems unlikely that there's actually a performance benefit from it, of course, but just to play devil's advocate. –  femtoRgon Dec 7 '12 at 18:21
    
@sharth: That's a good point, thanks. I've completely redone the solution. I believe the new one to be a lot better (and correct!) –  NPE Dec 7 '12 at 18:22
    
@femtoRgon: I can't imagine that isPrime(div) has anywhere near the cost of num % div. isPrime will be orders of magnitude more expensive. –  Bill Lynch Dec 7 '12 at 18:25

NPE has provided a (tail) recursive version, here's the iterative version:

What we do here is:

  1. Our first possible divisor is 2. Try that value.
  2. If it divides the number evenly, then print the divisor, and divide our target number by that divisor.
  3. If it doesn't divide, then try the next divisor. div += 1.

Note that we don't increment div when it does divide. This is because of cases like 20, where 2 divides it multiple times.

void printPrimeFactors(int num) {
    int div = 2;

    while (num != 1) {
        if (num % div == 0) {
            cout << num << " ";
            num /= div;
        } else {
            div += 1;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you mate, but I am supposed to write a recursive function. –  Quaker Dec 7 '12 at 18:34

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