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Sorry for the poor title. I have a query (below) that executes properly and creates an insertion just as I would desire. However, I want to make it smarter by only inserting when the exact combination of three columns. Essentially, the three column tuple is a primary key, but I'm working with the limitation of sqlite's single primary key.

Basic Context I have 4 tables: Permissions, Roles, Users, Actions Permissions connects Roles and Users to Actions. The Actions table has a list of available tasks that a User or a user with a Role can perform. So for example, if user_id = 1 can perform a list_folder action (action_id = 1), then the permissions table would have an entry: (id=1, action_id=1, user_id=1, role_id=NULL). Likewise, suppose an owner_role (role_id=1) might have permissions to perform a list_folder action (action_id=1), then the permissions entry might be: (id=2, action_id=1, user_id=NULL, role_id=1).

When I do an insert, I want to make sure that I do not already have that exact combination (e.g. action_id=1, user_id=NULL, role_id=1). And I'm not entirely sure how to write the sql so that I have this setup properly.

Here's my basic insert statement. I need to come up with an insert and a replace statement:

INSERT INTO permissions (
   action_id
   ,role_id
)
SELECT DISTINCT
   a.id as "action_id"
   ,r.id as "role_id"
   FROM tmp_permissions tmp
   LEFT OUTER JOIN actions a
       ON tmp.action_name = a.name
   LEFT OUTER JOIN roles r
       ON tmp.roles_name = r.name
   LEFT OUTER JOIN permissions p
       ON p.role_id

Here are some creation sql statements for the tables:

CREATE TABLE permissions (
id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
enabled INTEGER, 
action_id INTEGER, 
user_id INTEGER, 
role_id INTEGER, 
PRIMARY KEY (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(user_id) REFERENCES users (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(action_id) REFERENCES actions (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(role_id) REFERENCES roles (id)
);
CREATE TABLE actions (
id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
enabled INTEGER, 
name VARCHAR(50), 
permission_ids INTEGER, 
PRIMARY KEY (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(permission_ids) REFERENCES permissions (id)
);
CREATE TABLE roles (
id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
enabled INTEGER, 
name VARCHAR(50), 
permission_ids INTEGER, 
PRIMARY KEY (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(permission_ids) REFERENCES permissions (id)
);
CREATE TABLE users (
id INTEGER NOT NULL, 
enabled INTEGER, 
name VARCHAR(50), 
permission_ids INTEGER, 
PRIMARY KEY (id), 
FOREIGN KEY(permission_ids) REFERENCES permissions (id)
);

Here's a temp table I'm using to store the data in the table while I work with it: CREATE TABLE tmp_permissions( roles_name VARCHAR(50), action_name VARCHAR(50) );

Here's some data:

#role|action
admin|setup
admin|debug
admin|login
admin|view_user
manager|view_employee
manager|enroll_employee
manager|login
employee|schedule
employee|login
customer|guest_login
customer|change_credentials
guest|guest_login

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

Add a UNIQUE constraint to the table:

CREATE TABLE permissions(
    ... ,
    UNIQUE (action_id, user_id, role_id)
)

You can then use any of the conflict resolution algorithms to handle duplicates.

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