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I'm new to StackOverflow and I'm just wondering why my C code is giving me this error. I really want this resolved and if someone could explain why this is happening rather then just give me the answer, that would be greatly appreciated.

void scanningForWS(int argc, char **argv)
{

int number = 0;
int sflag = 0;
int opt = 0;
int *s = 0;
char *getopt = 0;
char *optarg = 0;

while ((opt = *getopt(argc, argv, "w:s")) != -1) //the *getopt gives me this error
//Error: Expression much have a pointer-to function

{
switch (opt)
{
case 's':
    sflag = 1;
    break;
case 'w':
    number = atoi(optarg);
    break;
default:
    break;
}
}

}

It's the while statement, I commented where needed.

Problem found, but not solved yet. I have found out I don't have unistd.h and I cannot get it. Does anyone know where I can get it?

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Ohh, so would you suggest me changing the variable declaration to something other then getopt? Or would you suggest changing the getopt in the while statement? I'm fairly new to C and I'm really confused on this error/typo lol –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:00
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3 Answers 3

Remove char *getopt; getopt is a function from unistd.h and by declaring that char pointer you're doing something very weird :)

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1  
Lol I just learned that it's a function, but I can't #include <unistd.h>. Is there a way I can download it from somewhere? –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:09
    
@user1886339: A header file is not all that is needed, it is simply the interface. YOu need the library which contains the implementation as well. Look at the link I sent you. –  Ed S. Dec 7 '12 at 19:31
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You are declaring a variable with the same name as the function and I can't say if you have included the proper header at all.

That's not a function declaration FYI, that line declares a pointer to char and initializes it with the value 0. The only way your current code makes any sense is if getopt is a function pointer, which it is not.

Your code should be:

#include <unistd.h>

void scanningForWS(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int number = 0;
    int sflag = 0;
    int opt = 0;
    int *s = 0;    
    /* char *getopt = 0; do not declare getopt as a variable, 
                         just include the header uninstd.h and use it */

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "w:s")) != -1)
        /* ... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Lol, I'm not sure if my VS copy is just buggy :( It tells me now that getopt is undefined. –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:05
    
It only becomes undefined after I comment out the declaration, if I keep the declaration I get that pointer-to error I got before :/ –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:06
    
@user1886339: getopt is a unix function, it does not exist in the VS CRT and it is not standard C. If you need it look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1935455/… –  Ed S. Dec 7 '12 at 19:07
    
@user1886339: There's nothing buggy about your VS copy. It tells you that it is undefined because it is indeed undefined. C Standard Library knows nothing about any getopt function. And you did not define it yourself. Why do you expect the compiler to somehow magically know what getopt is? –  AndreyT Dec 7 '12 at 19:11
    
Yup, I finally got it through my head. I don't have the unistd.h library lol, but how can I get it? It shouldn't be too hard, now can it? –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:12
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getopt returns an int, not int *.

Remove the * from the use in while loop:

while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "w:s")) != -1) //the *getopt gives me this error

to:

while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "w:s")) != -1) //the *getopt gives me this error
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, unfortunately I still have the same error. Nothing changed :( –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 18:57
    
@user1886339: read my comment. –  Ed S. Dec 7 '12 at 18:58
    
@user1886339 Seems you are declaring a pointer with the same name getopt. To use the standard getopt, just include #include <unistd.h>. –  Blue Moon Dec 7 '12 at 19:02
    
Oh boy, one problem after another lol. If I put #include <unistd.h> it gives me an error saying: cannot open source file unistd.h –  user1886339 Dec 7 '12 at 19:08
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