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If you have a list of names e.g. Ian, Stephen and a database table as follows:

Names (table name)
Ian
Stephen
Maria

You could find the names in the list that appear in the table by this query: select * from names where names not in ('Ian','Stephen'). This would return 'Maria'.

How would I find values that exist in the list, but not in the database? For example, if I had a list of: Ian,Maria,Kevin and a table of:

Names (table name)
Ian
Maria

How could I write a query to return Kevin? I know I could load the list into a separate table and LEFT JOIN them, but I wandered if there was an easier way.

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What data source are you getting "Kevin" from? It has to come from somewhere. . . –  jchapa Dec 7 '12 at 19:01
    
@jchapa, it is just a list copied from Excel. –  w0051977 Dec 7 '12 at 19:02
    
Do you copy it by hand? Or do you use some tool to create the query from the list? –  dmaij Dec 7 '12 at 19:03
    
@jchapa,yes I am. –  w0051977 Dec 7 '12 at 19:04
1  
What RDBMS are you using? –  Esoteric Screen Name Dec 7 '12 at 19:08

5 Answers 5

There is not an easier way in SQL. Doing the LEFT JOIN or NOT IN is the SQL way of doing it, but you need a table. Now, you don't have to create an actual table. You can have something like:

with names as (
     select 'Ian' as name union all
     select 'Maria' as name union all
     select 'Kevin' as name
)
select *
from names n
where n.name not in (select name from t)

You could also do this in Excel:

  1. Put the values in a column
  2. Create an in list and run the query
  3. Put the results in a column
  4. Use vlookup or match to find the differences
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Thanks, +1 for the WITH statement. This is a potential solution. –  w0051977 Dec 7 '12 at 19:21
select a.name from
(select "Ian" name from dual
 union
 select "Maria" from dual
 union
 select "Stephen" from dual) a
left outer join Names n using (name)
where n.name is null
share|improve this answer
    
@Barmer you are fast, by the time I experiment ;) got downvoted for first wrong answer. –  bonCodigo Dec 7 '12 at 19:34

In TSQL I would load the list of names into a table variable and join it to your Names table for either version of the search. Since variable tables reside in memory, this avoids the overhead of creating a normal table or temp table and writing the values to disk for a one time operation.

Declare @Temp table
(
    Name varchar(32)
)

Insert Into @Temp
Select 'Ian'
Union
Select'Stephen'
Union 
Select'Kevin'


Select
    T.Name
From @Temp as T
    left join Names as N
        on T.Name = N.Name
Where N.Name IS NULL

In my experience this join structure is much more efficient than the "NOT IN" method.

EDIT: Updated code block for DB version

share|improve this answer
    
the NOT IN statement would not work. Please see bonCodigo's answer. That would return no rows. I want the query to return 'Kevin'. –  w0051977 Dec 7 '12 at 19:22
    
@w0051977 the NOT IN syntax does work if you load your list into a variable table, you just flip the relationship from what you had in your example. In every case I can remember though, a variable table and join out performed IN or NOT IN logic for anything more than a handful of values. –  Rozwel Dec 7 '12 at 19:30
select * from mytable 
where names in ('kevin', 'maria', 'ian')

UPDATED with correct input

I want to scratch the above :$

Please take a look at the following. And it's not the best query though. But I wanted to tried it out anyway.

Reference * SQLFIDDLE

Table:

NAME
john
ian
robin
maria
fen

Query:

select x.* from (
select * from names
union all
select 'kevin'
union all 
select 'ian'
union all
select 'maria') as x
where x.name not in 
(select * from names)
;

Results:

NAME
kevin
share|improve this answer
    
@W0051977 Do take a look at the SQLFIDDLE sample. –  bonCodigo Dec 7 '12 at 21:01

Not useful to the OP, but if you are in a SQL Server 2008 or higher environment, this syntax should work as well.

SELECT
    List.NAME
FROM ( VALUES
        ('Ian')
        ,('Maria')
        ,('Kevin')
    ) AS List(NAME)
    LEFT JOIN NAMES AS N
        ON List.NAME = N.NAME
WHERE N.NAME IS NULL
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