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Basically I want to create a 2 dimensional string array char* grid[4][4], and want to display their index as their value. eg grid[2][1] will have string "21" as its value. But their is some bug in this code, at run time it give me segmentation fault error. Please help me out.

char* grid[DIMENSION][DIMENSION];

for (int i = 0; i < DIMENSION; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < DIMENSION; j++)
    {   
        char* c = malloc(3 * sizeof(char));
        c = "00\0";            
        c[0] = c[0] + i;
        c[1] = c[1] + j;
        grid[i][j] = c;

    }
}        

for (int i = 0; i < DIMENSION; i++)
{ 
    for (int j = 0; j < DIMENSION; j++)
    {
        printf("%s\t", grid[i][j]);         
    }

    printf("\n");

}

return 0;

}

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2 Answers 2

Replace:

 char* c = "00";
 c[0] = c[0] + i;

with

char c[] = "00";
c[0] = c[0] + i;

it is not usually possible to change the value of a string literal. With gcc, you can change this behavior by specifying -fwritable-strings. Many compilers will put the string literal into a non-writable segment, but by declaring c as a character array it is guaranteed to be writable. (Although, now you have issues with the assignment to grid, so you probably want to use malloc.)

char *c = xmalloc(3);  /* xmalloc wraps malloc with error checking */
c[0] = '0' + i;
c[1] = '0' + j;
c[2] = 0;
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char * c exists inside the scope of the for(int j... loop , not outside it!

char * c = malloc(3);
strcpy(c,'00')
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