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I have a List<OrderItem> orderItems that contains all the items from the database for the batch of orders I'm working on. I also have a Dictionary<int, Order> order_list that contains the orders the items need to go in. The Order object has a List<OrderItem> member named OrderItems.

I have an Order with an ID of 1 in order_list. I have three items in OrderItems that carry the order_id of 1 with three different product variant id's.

The fetch from the database retrieves the items in the order of the product variant id. This means that orderItems looks something like this:

[0] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 4
[1] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 5
[2] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 6

In my code I have a loop that goes through the orderItems and assigns them to their respective orders:

foreach (OrderItem orderItem in orderItems)
{
    if (order_list.ContainsKey(orderItem.OrderId))
    {
        order_list[orderItem.OrderId].OrderItems.Add(orderItem);
    }
}

After the loop executes, I find the OrderItems member for order 1 looks like this:

[0] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 5
[1] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 6
[2] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 4

I stepped through the code carefully and watched it insert the elements. Here is what I saw it do:

Iteration 1 for product variant 4, the final OrderItems looked like this:

[0] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 4

Iteration 2 for product variant 5, the final OrderItems looked like this:

[0] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 5
[1] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 4

Iteration 3 for product variant 6, the final OrderItems looked like this:

[0] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 5
[1] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 6
[2] => orderId = 1, productVariantId = 4

My research has led me to conclude this should not be behaving such because the List<T>.Add() method should always add the new element to the END of the list. Can anyone tell me why the List<T>.Add() does not add the elements in order in my application?

share|improve this question
    
look into .Insert() instead of add() Insert is overloaded and you can specificy where to insert –  Scott Selby Dec 7 '12 at 19:54
1  
Are you sure the type for the OrderItems property of the Order class is List<T>? –  juan.facorro Dec 7 '12 at 19:58
10  
List doesn't have a ContainsKey method, which leads me to believe order_list is a Dictionary<int, Orders>. Can you confirm that? (That's an important detail here.) (Note that calling something that's really a dictionary a list is very confusing.) Also confirm the type of the key, is it int, or a custom type? (I'm skeptical that it's int.) Also, please show the code that's displaying your results. –  Servy Dec 7 '12 at 19:59
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Dec 7 '12 at 20:00
2  
@user1886461 insert won't change what's going on here. Add always adds items to the end of the list, which is what you want. Clearly there's quite a bit of important information you haven't included, and your problem most likely has nothing at all to do with any List. Providing the information I asked for would go a long way towards allowing us to try to effectively help you. As it is, we're in the dark. –  Servy Dec 7 '12 at 20:17
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2 Answers

I find that question does not provide enough code. Since I cannot comment, here is my interpretation, via LinqPad:

void Main()
{
    //populate
    var dbOrderItems = new List<OrderItem>();
    dbOrderItems.Add(new OrderItem { OrderId = 1, ProductVariantId = 4 });
    dbOrderItems.Add(new OrderItem { OrderId = 1, ProductVariantId = 5 });
    dbOrderItems.Add(new OrderItem { OrderId = 1, ProductVariantId = 6 });
    dbOrderItems.Add(new OrderItem { OrderId = 2, ProductVariantId = 10 });
    dbOrderItems.Add(new OrderItem { OrderId = 2, ProductVariantId = 11 });
    dbOrderItems.Dump();

    Dictionary<int, Order> order_list = new Dictionary<int, Order>();
    foreach(OrderItem orderItem in dbOrderItems)
    {
        if (order_list.ContainsKey(orderItem.OrderId))
        {
            var currOrderItems = order_list[orderItem.OrderId].OrderItems;
            if (currOrderItems.Contains(orderItem) == false)
            {
                // order exists, add new order item
                currOrderItems.Add(orderItem);
                order_list[orderItem.OrderId].OrderItems = currOrderItems; 
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // new order
            order_list.Add(orderItem.OrderId, new Order { OrderId = orderItem.OrderId, OrderItems = new List<OrderItem> { orderItem } });
        }
    }

    order_list.Dump();

}

// Define other methods and classes here
public class OrderItem
{
    public int OrderId {get;set;}
    public int ProductVariantId {get;set;}
}

public class Order
{
    public int OrderId {get;set;}
    public List<OrderItem> OrderItems {get;set;}
}

Output for Order 1:

OrderId ProductVariantId 
1 4 
1 5 
1 6 

Output for Order 2:

OrderId ProductVariantId 
2 10 
2 11 

Now, what was the question?

share|improve this answer
    
The question is, when I run a similar code, the output for the first orderId is: 1 5<br> 1 6<br> 1 4<br> –  sn_joe Dec 7 '12 at 23:40
    
Can you post your abbreviated code, so I can run it? I tried few different changes and print options and I always get 1 4 1 5 1 6. –  CrnaStena Dec 7 '12 at 23:55
    
You can find all of this in the discussion under the original post. –  sn_joe Dec 10 '12 at 17:28
add comment

The first line in the MSDN docs says "Adds an object to the end of the List<T>", so yes, order is maintained. You have a lot more going on in your code than simple list manipulation, but your sample is not complete enough to tell you what your mistake is.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for re-iterating a point I included in my initial post.</sarcasm> –  sn_joe Dec 10 '12 at 17:29
    
You are free to ignore it, but it answers the stated question of "List<T>.Add() does not add the elements in order?" I'd like to be more helpful, but I'm afraid this question does not currently have a better answer. –  bmm6o Dec 10 '12 at 18:27
    
I wrote "My research has led me to conclude this should not be behaving such because the List<T>.Add() method should always add the new element to the END of the list." And then followed it up with the question "Can anyone tell me why the List<T>.Add() does not add the elements in order in my application?" This answer fails to address the question. –  sn_joe Dec 10 '12 at 21:12
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