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Alright, so here is my code:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class CarRental {

    public static String model;
    public static int letternum;
    public static String plate;
    public static String letter;
    public static int total;              
    public static String alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        //System.out.println("Car Model:");
        //model = input.nextLine();
        System.out.println("License Plate: ");
        plate = input.nextLine();

        char one = plate.charAt(0);
        char two = plate.charAt(1);
        char three = plate.charAt(2);
        total = one + two + three;
        letternum = total % 24;

        char letter = alphabet.charAt(letternum);

        System.out.println("" + letter + total);

    }
}

What is going on is this, I'm trying to make it take my license plate input and take the characters at the places for 0, 1, and 2. Which in a license plate would be the three letters. Then, i'm trying to take their ASCII Values, add them all together and set them to the int "total". Then to find a Letter that is supposed to be in front of the total value, I find the remainder of the total by using % 6. Then it will take that value, and whatever number it is, say it is 4, it will take the 4th letter in the string "alphabet" and set that to a the char "letter". Then what it should do is print out the letter followed by the totals of the ASCII Value.

Here is an example of what is my input with expected outcome, followed by its ACTUAL outcome.

License Plate: CPR 607

Output: E836

My output with the exact same license plate is:

License Plate: CPR 607

n229

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong, but my best clue is that the fact that it is a char, it is treating it like its ASCII Value, rather than its String value(which i'm actually trying to get)

If anyone could suggest some tips, it would be a great help. Not necessarily code I can just leech off of, but how I should go about doing this the right way!

share|improve this question
    
Since you are working with capital letters, you are getting characters whose integer values are between 65 and 90. plate.charAt(...) - 64 will get you the letter's place in the alphabet, where A = 1, B = 2, etc –  jonhopkins Dec 7 '12 at 20:35
    
Okay, so if i'm getting what your saying, then, if I gave an input of cpr rather than CPR, it would work? I'm not sure i'm getting what your saying, except I get that it's assigning the ASCII value and all –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:37
    
It looks like you want to add the three numbers on the right side of the plate (607 in your example) to total, but you're not doing it in your code. –  Diego Basch Dec 7 '12 at 20:37
1  
How did you get that expected outcome is E836, what is the logic here? –  SergeyS Dec 7 '12 at 20:38
    
@SullyBrooks ASCII values are defined as 48-57 for the characters '0'-'9', 65-90 for the characters 'A'-'Z', and 97-122 for the characters 'a'-'z'. Based on the second to last paragraph in your question, I am assuming you want the letter's position in the alphabet, so you have to offset the character's ASCII value by the ASCII value of the first character in that set, which in the case of capital letters is 'A' with value of 65. –  jonhopkins Dec 7 '12 at 20:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to take the second part of the string (with the three numbers) and add it to your total. You can take that value with:

Integer.parseInt(plate.split(" ")[1])

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, this looks like it should work. But could you do me a huge favor and explain what exactly this does? I'm trying to make sure I understand my program completely in how it works and what every function does. But thanks! –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:49
    
you're splitting the string "CPR 607" into an array of two strings: ["CPR", "607"]. Then you take the second element (it's [1], the first one is [0]) and use a static method in the class Integer to parse "607" into an int. –  Diego Basch Dec 7 '12 at 20:54
    
Alright! I understand perfectly. Thanks so much for the help! –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:57

Change these lines:

int one = (int) plate.charAt(0);
int two = (int) plate.charAt(1);
int three = (int) plate.charAt(2);

This will give you the actual ASCII values for the characters.

If you want something else, you'll have to subtract a constant from each of the values, as jonhopkins illustrated in his comment.

Subtract 64 to get A = 1, B = 2, etc.

I see your problem.

The algorithm is to take the ASCII values of the first 3 characters and add them to the number (the last 3 characters).

Also, you have to divide by 6 to get the letters A - E. You're dividing by 24.

share|improve this answer
    
Alright. I tried it but it stayed the same. Now I get what you're doing by changing the values to int's rather than char values. Any other suggestions you have as it's not doing anything so far :/ –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:41
    
See my comment. It looks like you want to add the 607 to your total. That requires parsing the rest of the string, you're ignoring it. –  Diego Basch Dec 7 '12 at 20:43
    
No need to cast here, your code is useless –  SergeyS Dec 7 '12 at 20:47
    
Okay, I think I understand you. I'm going to be using the ParseInt(what string/char) method correct? And which value should I be parsing exactly? I'm overthinking this but would like to understand WHY this needs to be done. Thanks for the help again. –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:47
    
@SullyBrooks. No, you don't need that method. No need to cast character to integer. –  Rohit Jain Dec 7 '12 at 20:47

If you add the 229 value that you to the 607 in the license plate, you get the 836 number you say you're supposed to get, so it looks like your total variable is right, but you just need to add it to the number from the input.

The stuff everyone else is saying about shifting the ASCII values is for when you're determining the first character in the output.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, Thanks! I'll make sure to try this. –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:50
public static String model;
public static int letternum;
public static String plate;
public static String letter;
public static int total;              
public static String alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

    //System.out.println("Car Model:");
    //model = input.nextLine();
    System.out.println("License Plate: ");
    plate = input.nextLine();

    char one = plate.charAt(0);
    char two = plate.charAt(1);
    char three = plate.charAt(2);
    total = Integer.parseInt(one) + Integer.parseInt(two) + Integer.parseInt(three);
    letternum = total % 24;

    char letter = alphabet.charAt(letternum);

    System.out.println("" + letter + total);

}

you forgot to cast it to integer

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, so like the other answer your just changing the values from a char to an Int, now when I did this, my output stayed the same! Thanks for the help though. Any other suggestions? –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:39
2  
There is really no need to typecast here. Character addition will automatically take the characters as ASCII values –  Rohit Jain Dec 7 '12 at 20:43
    
That's what I thought but I think I got my solution. I'm really supposed to be adding the ASCII Values to the license plate numbers for my number! –  Sully Brooks Dec 7 '12 at 20:44

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