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I am trying to lay the foundation for a package but am having trouble even getting started. I have successfully created a basic package spec and want to just test the package body but I'm having trouble getting it to compile. The spec code is:

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE synchronize_my_data 
AS
  PROCEDURE synchronize_data(p_run_date IN date);
END synchronize_my_data;

and here is the package body code:

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY synchronize_my_data 
IS
  PROCEDURE synchronize_data(p_run_date IN date) IS
      PROCEDURE process_deletes(p_run_date IN date) IS
      BEGIN
          dbms_output.put_line('Run Date: ' || to_char(p_run_date, 'MM/DD/YYYY'));      
      END process_deletes;
  BEGIN
    process_deletes(p_run_date);
  END synchronize_data;

END synchronize_my_data;

I keep getting a compilation error but can't figure out what's wrong with the code. It seems like basic code, am I just missing something obvious?

share|improve this question
2  
You're missing telling us the compilation error perhaps? –  David Aldridge Dec 7 '12 at 20:36
1  
Works here without any changes. Maybe you don't have the right to execute dbms_output? –  ammoQ Dec 7 '12 at 20:40
    
my bad, I should have posted the compilation errors. I think ammoQ nailed it, I didn't have the right to execute ebms_output; I logged in as dba, ran it, and it executed just fine. thanks for the answers, and coding suggestions. –  user1408057 Dec 7 '12 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That code seems to compile for me. What error are you getting?

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE synchronize_my_data
  2  AS
  3    PROCEDURE synchronize_data(p_run_date IN date);
  4  END synchronize_my_data;
  5  /

Package created.

SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY synchronize_my_data
  2  IS
  3    PROCEDURE synchronize_data(p_run_date IN date) IS
  4        PROCEDURE process_deletes(p_run_date IN date) IS
  5        BEGIN
  6            dbms_output.put_line('Run Date: ' || to_char(p_run_date, 'MM/DD/YYYY'));
  7        END process_deletes;
  8    BEGIN
  9      process_deletes(p_run_date);
 10    END synchronize_data;
 11
 12  END synchronize_my_data;
 13  /

Package body created.

From a general stylistic standpoint, it generally makes very little sense to define a procedure within another procedure in a package body. One of the benefits of using packages is that you can have both public and private procedures. You can create the process_deletes procedure as a private procedure simply by defining it in the body without defining it in the spec.

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY synchronize_my_data 
IS
  PROCEDURE process_deletes(p_run_date IN date) 
  IS
  BEGIN
      dbms_output.put_line('Run Date: ' || to_char(p_run_date, 'MM/DD/YYYY'));      
  END process_deletes;

  PROCEDURE synchronize_data(p_run_date IN date) 
  IS
  BEGIN
    process_deletes(p_run_date);
  END synchronize_data;

END synchronize_my_data;

That shouldn't have anything to do with whatever error you're getting. But it should make your code easier to deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
A procedure within another procedure sees the local variables of the outer procedure, which can be handy sometimes to avoid procedures with a lot of parameters. –  ammoQ Dec 7 '12 at 20:42
    
@ammoQ - True, which is why I said "generally" rather than "always". If you have so many local variables that passing them to another procedure is excessive and your procedure is doing so much that you feel the need to factor something out into a separate procedure, however, 99 times out of 100, I'd suggest that you need to rethink the architecture a bit and break things up into multiple private procedures with relatively few parameters. –  Justin Cave Dec 7 '12 at 20:45
1  
"it generally makes very little sense to define a procedure within another procedure in a package body" Disagree utterly. I use private procedures within a package to hold common code, functionality which is called by multiple subroutines. I use procedures with a single procedure to organise my code. The ideal is to have an executable core which is visible in its entirety, but for "main" program units that can only be achieved by heavy modularisation, If a subroutine is - should, can - be called by only one program unit, put it in that unit's declaration section. –  APC Dec 7 '12 at 21:20
1  
@APC - Fascinating. I've used nested blocks occasionally in code and never found it as aesthetically pleasing as separate methods (and I haven't been fortunate enough to come across anyone that structured their code that way). That sounds like a really interesting conversation to have, though I'm not sure where it would be appropriate to have it. –  Justin Cave Dec 7 '12 at 22:09
1  
very related: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/137495/… –  ammoQ Dec 8 '12 at 2:03

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